Lovefilm and Netflix?

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  • NickNick Member Posts: 594
    edited 10 March 2017, 12:54AM
    Just been reading an article in El Reg about the shenanigans around the new chairman of Youview and spotted that one of the comments has a lovely hint that our wait could be over soon...

    Have a look at the "Anonymous Coward" post dated 6th March 2013 that says:
    "LoveFilm Instant, Blinkbox and Netflix apps are on their way.
    Anon cos I'm involved in some of the above"


    http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum...
  • drhowellsdrhowells Member Posts: 634 ✭✭
    edited 20 December 2016, 6:21PM
    Nick4 said:

    Just been reading an article in El Reg about the shenanigans around the new chairman of Youview and spotted that one of the comments has a lovely hint that our wait could be over soon...

    Have a look at the "Anonymous Coward" post dated 6th March 2013 that says:
    "LoveFilm Instant, Blinkbox and Netflix apps are on their way.
    Anon cos I'm involved in some of the above"


    http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum...

    I have never been under any doubt that at least Lovefilm and Netflix would be coming soon. I am not sure how much faith I would have in a comment made by an anonymous person on a site though, about anything.
  • NickNick Member Posts: 594
    edited 9 March 2015, 7:43AM
    Nick4 said:

    Just been reading an article in El Reg about the shenanigans around the new chairman of Youview and spotted that one of the comments has a lovely hint that our wait could be over soon...

    Have a look at the "Anonymous Coward" post dated 6th March 2013 that says:
    "LoveFilm Instant, Blinkbox and Netflix apps are on their way.
    Anon cos I'm involved in some of the above"


    http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum...

    I'm the same normally but El Reg is a website frequented by a load of dev teams across the UK and abroad. Its at least a possibility that the post was from one of the coders and I thought that people would be interested.
  • redchizredchiz Member, Super User Posts: 5,109 ✭✭✭
    edited 20 December 2016, 1:57PM
    Nick4 said:

    Just been reading an article in El Reg about the shenanigans around the new chairman of Youview and spotted that one of the comments has a lovely hint that our wait could be over soon...

    Have a look at the "Anonymous Coward" post dated 6th March 2013 that says:
    "LoveFilm Instant, Blinkbox and Netflix apps are on their way.
    Anon cos I'm involved in some of the above"


    http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum...

    "El Reg?" That website is full of superficially coruscating cynics. But as accurate/reliable as any other goss site. Trust as far as throw.
  • Adam4Adam4 Member Posts: 2
    edited 27 March 2013, 7:07PM

    Get an AppleTV box is dose all the above including NETFLIX and is only £99 or less.

    ATV doesn't do lovefilm, just netflix. It's a great box if you are iTunes centric and use other features like Airplay.
  • edited 8 January 2015, 4:53PM
    An article published yesterday on the Financial Times website quotes YouView's new chairman Sir Charles Dunstone as saying:
    "...that TalkTalk would remain a provider of content to its customers using the YouView platform, rather than become an owner of its own programmes. He said that competing for rights with technology groups such as Netflix and Lovefilm for example was very difficult. These are buying rights on a scale that is un­thinkable. No one can compete with that..."
  • Flaggy FlagPantsFlaggy FlagPants Member Posts: 64
    edited 10 March 2017, 12:54AM
    I wouldn't hold your breath personally.

    The reason being as it seemed pretty obvious early on that Sky had muscled into the YouView party. This was later confirmed with the addition of NowTV (Sky too of course)

    They might throw their toys out of the pram if YV then added demand viewing that was around a third of the price of what Sky charge.

    Sure the NowTV system has more recent movies on it, but only a fraction of what Netflix and LoveFilm offer each. And it doesn't, as yet, carry any TV series. Which seems a bit crazy seeing as what the FOX network has access to.
  • drhowellsdrhowells Member Posts: 634 ✭✭
    edited 20 December 2016, 6:21PM

    I wouldn't hold your breath personally.

    The reason being as it seemed pretty obvious early on that Sky had muscled into the YouView party. This was later confirmed with the addition of NowTV (Sky too of course)

    They might throw their toys out of the pram if YV then added demand viewing that was around a third of the price of what Sky charge.

    Sure the NowTV system has more recent movies on it, but only a fraction of what Netflix and LoveFilm offer each. And it doesn't, as yet, carry any TV series. Which seems a bit crazy seeing as what the FOX network has access to.

    I don't understand your point. It has nothing to do with Sky who joins YouView or not. They are not a partner and have no say. More on demand content is only a good thing for YouView.
  • VisionmanVisionman Member, Super User Posts: 9,867 ✭✭✭
    edited 22 December 2016, 12:05AM

    I wouldn't hold your breath personally.

    The reason being as it seemed pretty obvious early on that Sky had muscled into the YouView party. This was later confirmed with the addition of NowTV (Sky too of course)

    They might throw their toys out of the pram if YV then added demand viewing that was around a third of the price of what Sky charge.

    Sure the NowTV system has more recent movies on it, but only a fraction of what Netflix and LoveFilm offer each. And it doesn't, as yet, carry any TV series. Which seems a bit crazy seeing as what the FOX network has access to.

    I think the point is it's always the tail that wags the dog. Smiley
    I'm now happy with the disagree icon, because its gone.
  • Flaggy FlagPantsFlaggy FlagPants Member Posts: 64
    edited 4 April 2013, 1:49PM

    Get an AppleTV box is dose all the above including NETFLIX and is only £99 or less.

    You can get a Roku for £49. Receive Netflix and media off your network via Plex as well as bags of other stuff.

    Beats Apple TV for half the price.
  • mark hancockmark hancock Member Posts: 6
    edited 4 April 2013, 5:17PM

    Martin

    Quote ...They are not in partnership with BSkyB. In fact BSkyB tried very hard to stop YouView from happening and only changed their mind very late in the day. Quote

    I read a different story on Wikipedia . shall look for the link post it .

    watch out as sky will i believe soon buy talk talk
  • Flaggy FlagPantsFlaggy FlagPants Member Posts: 64
    edited 4 April 2013, 5:35PM
    Madcotto said:

    its simple nowtv got exclusivity for a however long and nowt will be added till this over.

    this ends the ifs whys and buts couse like everyone here knows netfix gets and will be on every market asap

    gwatuk, it also does all that on the Roku platform too. As well as some movies not being available on YouView when they are on Roku. Strange that, I might just raise that as a question.
  • Flaggy FlagPantsFlaggy FlagPants Member Posts: 64
    edited 5 April 2013, 9:36AM
    Alan4 said:

    I have just bought a Sony blu ray that has Netflix/Lovefilm/Youtube, works well alongside my Youview box,....... but it would send the platform through the roof if it had those three, Blink box which is very good and the big one BT SPORTS !!!!!!! when it launches, and if so please also give it to your customer's who have normal broadband and not just infinity.

    Same sort of set up here. Only I've a LG BR player. It wasn't expensive and has those too. As well as Blinkbox, Acetrax (both services just like renting a movie from Blockbuster) and some others as I'm sure your Sony has these or something like it.

    I think the point being, if there's a service you want, I think it's best to get something that already serves you what you need. My combo, like yours, seems to cover all bases.

    But it's like my experience with Roku, awesome little box for £50, tons of public domain content as well as Netflix and NowTV. But despite tons and tons of users, me included, wanting LoveFilm on there, I doubt it will ever make an official appearance.

    Roku had a relationship with Netflix in the US, so launched here when they launched. But on coming to the UK, BSkyB got seriously interested and hence why NowTV is on there.

    Once Sky get in there, it seems they can throw their weight around block certain new apps or providers than might step on their toes.
  • Flaggy FlagPantsFlaggy FlagPants Member Posts: 64
    edited 5 April 2013, 9:44AM

    I wouldn't hold your breath personally.

    The reason being as it seemed pretty obvious early on that Sky had muscled into the YouView party. This was later confirmed with the addition of NowTV (Sky too of course)

    They might throw their toys out of the pram if YV then added demand viewing that was around a third of the price of what Sky charge.

    Sure the NowTV system has more recent movies on it, but only a fraction of what Netflix and LoveFilm offer each. And it doesn't, as yet, carry any TV series. Which seems a bit crazy seeing as what the FOX network has access to.

    That's quite right Visionman.

    Experience of Roku's great little box is an illustration of what happens when Sky come on board. They latched onto that as soon as it launched in the UK.

    In case you're not familiar with Roku, it's a streaming media player that even you or I could write an app, or "channel" for and access or allow others to access too.

    Since launch, users have been asking for LoveFilm access. It already had Netflix access as it's had a relationship with them in the US for some time. Some units even have a direct Netflix button on the remote. But when it came to the UK, Sky jumped onto it like a shot and in 6 months NowTV appeared.

    I can't honestly see LoveFilm on that platform. People have written their own LoveFilm apps to access the service (with valid password credentials, not unauthorised access), but they have been blocked by Roku.
  • edited 10 March 2017, 12:54AM
    Flaggy FlagPants claimed:

    The reason being as it seemed pretty obvious early on that Sky had muscled into the YouView party. This was later confirmed with the addition of NowTV (Sky too of course)

    They might throw their toys out of the pram if YV then added demand viewing that was around a third of the price of what Sky charge.


    I'm sorry but a lot of what you're posting is alarmist, inaccurate scaremongering and having had this pointed out to you before, I think it's time that you stopped making such comments.

    Sky does NOT have a say, veto or ability to influence which content providers or players get added to YouView.

    YouView is an open platform which provides access on a FRAND basis, anyone can join subject to passing the technical and content quality criteria.

    This is established in the legal documents establishing YouView and the protocols it operates under as a direct consequence of the BBC Trust's setting of conditions for the BBC's involvement in the project.

    To address another claim you've made, about reasons for not offering content filtering, YouView doesn't make money from selling the content or earn a commission from those services users sign up to. In fact it's not currently possible to sign up to services via the YouView software.
  • Flaggy FlagPantsFlaggy FlagPants Member Posts: 64
    edited 5 April 2013, 10:17AM

    http://thenextweb.com/uk/2012/07/04/y...
    quote ....

    “Having 2 brands will allow us to meet the needs of two distinct market segments,” said BSkyB’s CEO Jeremy Darroch during the launch of its soon-to-launch pay-per-play TV service earlier this year. “It will be a flexible, more spontaneous offering. It will be powered by Sky, offering the best, exclusive content all from a provider they can trust. Any notion that Sky is just a satellite broadcaster should be out the window now.”

    Buzzwords and hyperbole perhaps, but there is no underestimating the impact that Now TV will have on the UK television market. Most of the country doesn’t have a subscription TV package, but many will want to be able to access occasional content from Sky, such as movies and sport.

    The fact that YouView has gotten in early with this partnership could prove to be its trump card, though other factors will affect this – as previously discussed, the cost of YouView with subsequent STB manufacturers and ISP partnerships Quote

    Depends upon how you define partner. They aren't a partner in the BBC, ITV, CH4, etc., sense, but as a content provider they have a relationship that some would think of as partnership.

    And anytime you build up a relationship with anything relating to Sky or other Murdoch related interests, you pretty much find that they start having a pretty powerful influence on things. If they don't, they drop you and then systematically try and quash you. And often succeed.
  • PiersPiers Member Posts: 561 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited 6 March 2017, 10:48PM
    Martin - thanks for posting that. Spot on.

    Worth also mentioning that YouView is a non-for-profit company, although we do have a responsibility to generate revenue to offset our costs. We aim to do that by making the platform successful with lots of content and features.

    Flaggy, I really do hope that you're wanting to engage in an interesting and balanced discussion, but as a couple of people in this thread have mentioned it doesn't seem to be going this way.
  • drhowellsdrhowells Member Posts: 634 ✭✭
    edited 20 December 2016, 6:21PM

    http://thenextweb.com/uk/2012/07/04/y...
    quote ....

    “Having 2 brands will allow us to meet the needs of two distinct market segments,” said BSkyB’s CEO Jeremy Darroch during the launch of its soon-to-launch pay-per-play TV service earlier this year. “It will be a flexible, more spontaneous offering. It will be powered by Sky, offering the best, exclusive content all from a provider they can trust. Any notion that Sky is just a satellite broadcaster should be out the window now.”

    Buzzwords and hyperbole perhaps, but there is no underestimating the impact that Now TV will have on the UK television market. Most of the country doesn’t have a subscription TV package, but many will want to be able to access occasional content from Sky, such as movies and sport.

    The fact that YouView has gotten in early with this partnership could prove to be its trump card, though other factors will affect this – as previously discussed, the cost of YouView with subsequent STB manufacturers and ISP partnerships Quote

    Please don't start this arguement again. They are not a partner in the sense that YouView has 7 partners who make up YouView. Sky have NO say at all. Sky tried to squash YouView before it started and failed. With the BBC involved, there can be no favouritism towards a company like Sky. It all HAS to be open to all.
  • Flaggy FlagPantsFlaggy FlagPants Member Posts: 64
    edited 5 April 2013, 10:49AM
    Martin1 said:

    Flaggy FlagPants claimed:

    The reason being as it seemed pretty obvious early on that Sky had muscled into the YouView party. This was later confirmed with the addition of NowTV (Sky too of course)

    They might throw their toys out of the pram if YV then added demand viewing that was around a third of the price of what Sky charge.


    I'm sorry but a lot of what you're posting is alarmist, inaccurate scaremongering and having had this pointed out to you before, I think it's time that you stopped making such comments.

    Sky does NOT have a say, veto or ability to influence which content providers or players get added to YouView.

    YouView is an open platform which provides access on a FRAND basis, anyone can join subject to passing the technical and content quality criteria.

    This is established in the legal documents establishing YouView and the protocols it operates under as a direct consequence of the BBC Trust's setting of conditions for the BBC's involvement in the project.

    To address another claim you've made, about reasons for not offering content filtering, YouView doesn't make money from selling the content or earn a commission from those services users sign up to. In fact it's not currently possible to sign up to services via the YouView software.

    I think you ought to review what I've read and differentiate between "claim" and speculation of what's probably and logically going on. In the real world.

    YouView invested a lot of money in setting up, what I think, is a great idea. And despite delays in launching, haven't done too bad at meeting what they set out to do.

    But given how much investment has gone into developing, advertising etc., I am at pains to see when YouView will ever make any real money off anything if what you are saying is totally true. And I wouldn't have thought that someone like Alan Sugar would have sanctioned any of it.

    What you imply is YouView purely make their money as a box-seller. Well they don't produce the box, and they don't own any content. A Humax YouView box retails at a similar price to it's equivalent Humax non-YouView box. So can you see why I struggle where the cash is being made?

    My comments have been misconstrued as scaremongering. They are only scare-worthy if it was illegal to actually make money from something here in the UK. Last time I looked it wasn't. We're still capitalist as far as I know.

    There's nothing wrong, or dirty or immoral, about making money.

    So what's YouView's plan to claw back the hundreds of millions it invested in getting off the ground? Because if it's purely box-shifting, then "I'm out" to coin a phrase.

    But if it's also a mechanism to build up relationships with content providers through promoting their content and making money much in the way that something like YouTube makes ton's off, then that seems more of a viable business plan.

    I can see how some of the more small-minded paranoid people might have taken some elements of my comments as YouView being a "rip-off", but that isn't my point at all. I think it's great at what it does in my experience. But that's their problem for viewing those comments in that way I'm afraid.

    I base a lot of what I say on other Sky relationships (not partnerships as that seems to be a dirty word too here) and the influence they can have. Not least in what they have achieved at Roku. Which, incidentally, is much closer to an "open platform" than YouView is at present.

    Or could you point me in the direction of the YouView source code or at least an SDK that I could start developing things for it on?
  • edited 25 April 2013, 7:56PM
    Martin1 said:

    Flaggy FlagPants claimed:

    The reason being as it seemed pretty obvious early on that Sky had muscled into the YouView party. This was later confirmed with the addition of NowTV (Sky too of course)

    They might throw their toys out of the pram if YV then added demand viewing that was around a third of the price of what Sky charge.


    I'm sorry but a lot of what you're posting is alarmist, inaccurate scaremongering and having had this pointed out to you before, I think it's time that you stopped making such comments.

    Sky does NOT have a say, veto or ability to influence which content providers or players get added to YouView.

    YouView is an open platform which provides access on a FRAND basis, anyone can join subject to passing the technical and content quality criteria.

    This is established in the legal documents establishing YouView and the protocols it operates under as a direct consequence of the BBC Trust's setting of conditions for the BBC's involvement in the project.

    To address another claim you've made, about reasons for not offering content filtering, YouView doesn't make money from selling the content or earn a commission from those services users sign up to. In fact it's not currently possible to sign up to services via the YouView software.

    But given how much investment has gone into developing, advertising etc., I am at pains to see when YouView will ever make any real money off anything if what you are saying is totally true.

    It doesn't exist to make money, it is a not for profit company. It will cover its costs by charging content providers for things such as an EPG space for IPTV channels. But again, it is only allowed to make a fair charge on a cost recovery basis.

    There is no element of profit allowed.

    the joint venture may develop ways in which to recover operational costs but, for the avoidance of doubt, any such activity will be charged to third parties on a "cost recovery" basis only;

    Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbctrust/assets/...

    And I wouldn't have thought that someone like Alan Sugar would have sanctioned any of it.


    Sugar was an employee of the YouView shareholders, he doesn't not and never did own the company and was there to do as he was told. He is no longer involved.

    >> What you imply is YouView purely make their money as a box-seller

    No, they don't make money from selling the box. I've already explained how they make money to cover their costs.

    >> So can you see why I struggle where the cash is being made?

    Because you're failing to listen to, and accept the explanations you've already had.

    >> So what's YouView's plan to claw back the hundreds of millions it invested in getting off the ground?

    That money was an investment by the 7 shareholders in the future of digital terrestrial TV and, in the case of BT and TalkTalk, their ability to compete with Sky and Virgin Media.

    BT and TT will see their return by offering triple-play products, the commercial broadcasters now have a big-screen platform where they can monetise on-demand content. ITV already has plans to sell access to archive content.

    The BBC will write off their investment as simply one of many ways in which to serve the licence fee payer.

    YouView isn't a content, hardware selling company. It's not Sky, Amstrad, Apple or Virgin Media. Once you stop seeing it as such, it will all become much clearer.

    >> Or could you point me in the direction of the YouView source code or at least an SDK that I could start developing things for it on?

    If you were a content provider you could sign up here: https://contentregistration.youview.com
  • drhowellsdrhowells Member Posts: 634 ✭✭
    edited 20 December 2016, 6:21PM
    Martin1 said:

    Flaggy FlagPants claimed:

    The reason being as it seemed pretty obvious early on that Sky had muscled into the YouView party. This was later confirmed with the addition of NowTV (Sky too of course)

    They might throw their toys out of the pram if YV then added demand viewing that was around a third of the price of what Sky charge.


    I'm sorry but a lot of what you're posting is alarmist, inaccurate scaremongering and having had this pointed out to you before, I think it's time that you stopped making such comments.

    Sky does NOT have a say, veto or ability to influence which content providers or players get added to YouView.

    YouView is an open platform which provides access on a FRAND basis, anyone can join subject to passing the technical and content quality criteria.

    This is established in the legal documents establishing YouView and the protocols it operates under as a direct consequence of the BBC Trust's setting of conditions for the BBC's involvement in the project.

    To address another claim you've made, about reasons for not offering content filtering, YouView doesn't make money from selling the content or earn a commission from those services users sign up to. In fact it's not currently possible to sign up to services via the YouView software.

    Partnership is not a 'dirty word' here, but it is certainly an inaccurate one in the context it is being used. They are not a YouView partner. BBC, ITV, Five etc are partners. They have a say in how things are run. Sky do not.
  • Flaggy FlagPantsFlaggy FlagPants Member Posts: 64
    edited 5 April 2013, 11:08AM
    Piers2 said:

    Martin - thanks for posting that. Spot on.

    Worth also mentioning that YouView is a non-for-profit company, although we do have a responsibility to generate revenue to offset our costs. We aim to do that by making the platform successful with lots of content and features.

    Flaggy, I really do hope that you're wanting to engage in an interesting and balanced discussion, but as a couple of people in this thread have mentioned it doesn't seem to be going this way.

    I can assure you I genuinely do Piers. And I really thought that's what I'd get.

    On the not-for-profit aspect, even I'm not so green as to think that YouView are doing this just to feel all warm and fuzzy. And are prepared to forget about the set-up costs of the whole venture.

    And, like I've pointed out, what's wrong with making money anyway?
  • edited 25 April 2013, 7:56PM
    Piers2 said:

    Martin - thanks for posting that. Spot on.

    Worth also mentioning that YouView is a non-for-profit company, although we do have a responsibility to generate revenue to offset our costs. We aim to do that by making the platform successful with lots of content and features.

    Flaggy, I really do hope that you're wanting to engage in an interesting and balanced discussion, but as a couple of people in this thread have mentioned it doesn't seem to be going this way.

    >> On the not-for-profit aspect, even I'm not so green as to think that YouView are doing this just to feel all warm and fuzzy. And are prepared to forget about the set-up costs of the whole venture.

    You've had the answer on this, I gave it to you above.
  • Flaggy FlagPantsFlaggy FlagPants Member Posts: 64
    edited 5 April 2013, 11:18AM
    Martin1 said:

    Flaggy FlagPants claimed:

    The reason being as it seemed pretty obvious early on that Sky had muscled into the YouView party. This was later confirmed with the addition of NowTV (Sky too of course)

    They might throw their toys out of the pram if YV then added demand viewing that was around a third of the price of what Sky charge.


    I'm sorry but a lot of what you're posting is alarmist, inaccurate scaremongering and having had this pointed out to you before, I think it's time that you stopped making such comments.

    Sky does NOT have a say, veto or ability to influence which content providers or players get added to YouView.

    YouView is an open platform which provides access on a FRAND basis, anyone can join subject to passing the technical and content quality criteria.

    This is established in the legal documents establishing YouView and the protocols it operates under as a direct consequence of the BBC Trust's setting of conditions for the BBC's involvement in the project.

    To address another claim you've made, about reasons for not offering content filtering, YouView doesn't make money from selling the content or earn a commission from those services users sign up to. In fact it's not currently possible to sign up to services via the YouView software.

    Thank you Martin, for a reply that doesn't just hurl accusations at me of scare-mongering or some whacky conspiracy theorist. Your time is appreciated.

    A lot of what you say backs up some of my points on this forum that I have been flamed by other's for.

    Please don't accuse me of "failing to listen" when, before your taking the time to explain, all I was being asked to listen to was accusations of my motives and abuse. That's hardly fair now is it?

    Thank you again.
  • Flaggy FlagPantsFlaggy FlagPants Member Posts: 64
    edited 5 April 2013, 11:26AM
    Martin1 said:

    Flaggy FlagPants claimed:

    The reason being as it seemed pretty obvious early on that Sky had muscled into the YouView party. This was later confirmed with the addition of NowTV (Sky too of course)

    They might throw their toys out of the pram if YV then added demand viewing that was around a third of the price of what Sky charge.


    I'm sorry but a lot of what you're posting is alarmist, inaccurate scaremongering and having had this pointed out to you before, I think it's time that you stopped making such comments.

    Sky does NOT have a say, veto or ability to influence which content providers or players get added to YouView.

    YouView is an open platform which provides access on a FRAND basis, anyone can join subject to passing the technical and content quality criteria.

    This is established in the legal documents establishing YouView and the protocols it operates under as a direct consequence of the BBC Trust's setting of conditions for the BBC's involvement in the project.

    To address another claim you've made, about reasons for not offering content filtering, YouView doesn't make money from selling the content or earn a commission from those services users sign up to. In fact it's not currently possible to sign up to services via the YouView software.

    It depends upon your definition of "partner" Dr. Of course they aren't a partner like the TV networks are or TalkTalk etc., but they do have a habit of throwing their weight around and getting their own way.

    Like it's been said, they did everything they could to try and block the project. Then when all that failed, they turn it in their favour by getting at least some chance of business into the homes that don't have a dish.
  • drhowellsdrhowells Member Posts: 634 ✭✭
    edited 20 December 2016, 6:21PM
    Martin1 said:

    Flaggy FlagPants claimed:

    The reason being as it seemed pretty obvious early on that Sky had muscled into the YouView party. This was later confirmed with the addition of NowTV (Sky too of course)

    They might throw their toys out of the pram if YV then added demand viewing that was around a third of the price of what Sky charge.


    I'm sorry but a lot of what you're posting is alarmist, inaccurate scaremongering and having had this pointed out to you before, I think it's time that you stopped making such comments.

    Sky does NOT have a say, veto or ability to influence which content providers or players get added to YouView.

    YouView is an open platform which provides access on a FRAND basis, anyone can join subject to passing the technical and content quality criteria.

    This is established in the legal documents establishing YouView and the protocols it operates under as a direct consequence of the BBC Trust's setting of conditions for the BBC's involvement in the project.

    To address another claim you've made, about reasons for not offering content filtering, YouView doesn't make money from selling the content or earn a commission from those services users sign up to. In fact it's not currently possible to sign up to services via the YouView software.

    Um, I know that....it was my definition and it was not what you were saying above. They cannot get their own way in this project for the reasons stated.
  • edited 25 April 2013, 7:56PM
    Martin1 said:

    Flaggy FlagPants claimed:

    The reason being as it seemed pretty obvious early on that Sky had muscled into the YouView party. This was later confirmed with the addition of NowTV (Sky too of course)

    They might throw their toys out of the pram if YV then added demand viewing that was around a third of the price of what Sky charge.


    I'm sorry but a lot of what you're posting is alarmist, inaccurate scaremongering and having had this pointed out to you before, I think it's time that you stopped making such comments.

    Sky does NOT have a say, veto or ability to influence which content providers or players get added to YouView.

    YouView is an open platform which provides access on a FRAND basis, anyone can join subject to passing the technical and content quality criteria.

    This is established in the legal documents establishing YouView and the protocols it operates under as a direct consequence of the BBC Trust's setting of conditions for the BBC's involvement in the project.

    To address another claim you've made, about reasons for not offering content filtering, YouView doesn't make money from selling the content or earn a commission from those services users sign up to. In fact it's not currently possible to sign up to services via the YouView software.

    Will you please stop this, there is no weight for Sky to throw around.

    Here are the companies who own YouView: http://www.youview.com/partners/

    Sky is simply one company which has applied to YouView to offer some content via their boxes. Being accepted through the same application process that Netflix, Lovefilm, Blinkbox or HMV on Demand will have to go through gives them no special rights or say over who else YouView accept.

    The first Sky will know about the arrival of Netflix, Lovefilm, Blinkbox or HMV on Demand will be when YouView issues their press release and their Players appear on the boxes.

    The only action Sky could take at that point is to remove their Player from the service if they wanted to go sulk.

    In doing so they'd send any customers they have (there are only 25,000 No TV customers across all devices and platforms) to the very rival whose arrival they were sulking about.

    This isn't like VM v Sky over the basic channels of onDigital v Sky.
  • edited 5 April 2013, 11:38AM
    Martin1 said:

    Flaggy FlagPants claimed:

    The reason being as it seemed pretty obvious early on that Sky had muscled into the YouView party. This was later confirmed with the addition of NowTV (Sky too of course)

    They might throw their toys out of the pram if YV then added demand viewing that was around a third of the price of what Sky charge.


    I'm sorry but a lot of what you're posting is alarmist, inaccurate scaremongering and having had this pointed out to you before, I think it's time that you stopped making such comments.

    Sky does NOT have a say, veto or ability to influence which content providers or players get added to YouView.

    YouView is an open platform which provides access on a FRAND basis, anyone can join subject to passing the technical and content quality criteria.

    This is established in the legal documents establishing YouView and the protocols it operates under as a direct consequence of the BBC Trust's setting of conditions for the BBC's involvement in the project.

    To address another claim you've made, about reasons for not offering content filtering, YouView doesn't make money from selling the content or earn a commission from those services users sign up to. In fact it's not currently possible to sign up to services via the YouView software.

    >> A lot of what you say backs up some of my points on this forum that I have been flamed by other's for.

    I don't think it does at all. YouView doesn't make money based on who signs up for which provider.
  • RoyRoy Member, Super User Posts: 16,026 ✭✭✭
    edited 7 December 2016, 8:38AM
    Piers2 said:

    Martin - thanks for posting that. Spot on.

    Worth also mentioning that YouView is a non-for-profit company, although we do have a responsibility to generate revenue to offset our costs. We aim to do that by making the platform successful with lots of content and features.

    Flaggy, I really do hope that you're wanting to engage in an interesting and balanced discussion, but as a couple of people in this thread have mentioned it doesn't seem to be going this way.

    You can lead a horse to water....
    These tests for COVID-19 might get right up my nose, if only I could get one
  • redchizredchiz Member, Super User Posts: 5,109 ✭✭✭
    edited 28 February 2017, 3:05PM
    It's not about making money or not blah-de-blah, it's about completely missing the point. If you can accept that and move on we can all continue with a hopefully civilised discussion.
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