[Discussion] Humax software update 27.46.0

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  • JoeJoe Member, Super User Posts: 2,064 ✭✭✭
    edited 23 March 2017, 7:13PM
    NickH said:

    I thought I'd try and explain why the use of thumbnail images in the new UI is wrong. Here goes...

    The use of thumbnails has it roots in cover art. Despite being told not to, people do judge books by their cover. In the pre-digital age music albums were recognised by the cover/box of the vinyl/CD. Cinematic films are advertised on billboards by an image that attempts to convey the themes of the film. Cover art is a highly evolved medium and very much a part of life.

    When Apple introduced album cover art to iTunes and the iPod it was pretty cool. Being able to flick through a carousel of images was a neat way to quickly find the album you are looking for. However, there is an underlying assumption that the user will be able to effortlessly recognise the album they're seeking simply from a brief glimpse of an image. Certainly during the period when people were transitioning from owning music on a physical media to digital, people did recognise their favourite albums based purely on the image that was on the front of the CD case.

    The cool cover art approach to browsing your music collection was undoubtedly a great addition, but Apple always retained the option to browse the collection via sorted lists - which could be sorted by many different metadata fields. The aim was to provide the quickest and easiest way to access the collection.

    A critical factor in the success of Apple's album art implementation was responsiveness. The concept worked well because the speed with which the carousel turned was variable. The user could choose to flick through slowly, or they could rapidly move to a much later point. Without the responsiveness the attraction of using the interface is greatly diminished, and would easily become frustrating.

    Browsing a collection by thumbnail images can be extended from music albums to films because the film's title and its artwork are designed to work together. People associate their favourite films with the images that are used to promote them. In addition, people can easily judge the type of film based purely on the image. If they're looking for an action film they know to skip past the one with the image of a cute kitten, or if they don't like horror then the image filled with bloody gore probably isn't for them.

    The use of thumbnails has been extended to previewing written documents, but in this case the usage is very much for preview and navigation within the document. Only in the case when the first page of the document contains the title in large text can a thumbnail be used to represent it – and in that case the thumbnail is simply a pictorial rendering of the text.

    So, in a world when thumbnails are cool and trendy, YouView thought it wise to revamp the MyView Recordings and Schedule screen. Unfortunately they failed to appreciate a fundamental point. The thumbnails are only beneficial if the user, upon first seeing a thumbnail, can effortlessly determine exactly which TV programme it represents. This is not the case. When I record a programme I do not know what thumbnail will be associated with it, therefore when I view the recordings screen the presence of a thumbnail does not allow me to quickly find the programme. I know the title of the programme, and I might know when it was recorded; both pieces of information are much easier to find when presented in a sorted list.

    Proof that the use of thumbnails has been applied without sufficient thought is the fact that the first thumbnail on each page is 4 times the size of the others. Why make the first one larger? It does not have any special status, it is only larger because due to the number of recordings (or scheduled items) it happens to be the first one on a given page. No doubt the layout looked great as a screenshot in a Powerpoint presentation, but in terms of enhancing the usability it is utterly worthless.

    We are not being Luddites by disliking the new Recordings and Schedule screens. We are arguing that in this context the thumbnails are not beneficial, and actually make navigating the screens more difficult than they previously were. YouView absolutely need to add an option to show the recordings and schedule as a list. From an engineering perspective, I'd be very surprised if presenting the data as list is not easier than presenting it as thumbnails. We are not asking for something that is difficult. YouView need to acknowledge that they've made a fundamental mistake, and rectify it as soon as possible.

    Heh heh Yes just thought i'd share it :) 
  • redchizredchiz Member, Super User Posts: 5,433 ✭✭✭
    edited 23 March 2017, 7:21PM
    NickH said:

    I thought I'd try and explain why the use of thumbnail images in the new UI is wrong. Here goes...

    The use of thumbnails has it roots in cover art. Despite being told not to, people do judge books by their cover. In the pre-digital age music albums were recognised by the cover/box of the vinyl/CD. Cinematic films are advertised on billboards by an image that attempts to convey the themes of the film. Cover art is a highly evolved medium and very much a part of life.

    When Apple introduced album cover art to iTunes and the iPod it was pretty cool. Being able to flick through a carousel of images was a neat way to quickly find the album you are looking for. However, there is an underlying assumption that the user will be able to effortlessly recognise the album they're seeking simply from a brief glimpse of an image. Certainly during the period when people were transitioning from owning music on a physical media to digital, people did recognise their favourite albums based purely on the image that was on the front of the CD case.

    The cool cover art approach to browsing your music collection was undoubtedly a great addition, but Apple always retained the option to browse the collection via sorted lists - which could be sorted by many different metadata fields. The aim was to provide the quickest and easiest way to access the collection.

    A critical factor in the success of Apple's album art implementation was responsiveness. The concept worked well because the speed with which the carousel turned was variable. The user could choose to flick through slowly, or they could rapidly move to a much later point. Without the responsiveness the attraction of using the interface is greatly diminished, and would easily become frustrating.

    Browsing a collection by thumbnail images can be extended from music albums to films because the film's title and its artwork are designed to work together. People associate their favourite films with the images that are used to promote them. In addition, people can easily judge the type of film based purely on the image. If they're looking for an action film they know to skip past the one with the image of a cute kitten, or if they don't like horror then the image filled with bloody gore probably isn't for them.

    The use of thumbnails has been extended to previewing written documents, but in this case the usage is very much for preview and navigation within the document. Only in the case when the first page of the document contains the title in large text can a thumbnail be used to represent it – and in that case the thumbnail is simply a pictorial rendering of the text.

    So, in a world when thumbnails are cool and trendy, YouView thought it wise to revamp the MyView Recordings and Schedule screen. Unfortunately they failed to appreciate a fundamental point. The thumbnails are only beneficial if the user, upon first seeing a thumbnail, can effortlessly determine exactly which TV programme it represents. This is not the case. When I record a programme I do not know what thumbnail will be associated with it, therefore when I view the recordings screen the presence of a thumbnail does not allow me to quickly find the programme. I know the title of the programme, and I might know when it was recorded; both pieces of information are much easier to find when presented in a sorted list.

    Proof that the use of thumbnails has been applied without sufficient thought is the fact that the first thumbnail on each page is 4 times the size of the others. Why make the first one larger? It does not have any special status, it is only larger because due to the number of recordings (or scheduled items) it happens to be the first one on a given page. No doubt the layout looked great as a screenshot in a Powerpoint presentation, but in terms of enhancing the usability it is utterly worthless.

    We are not being Luddites by disliking the new Recordings and Schedule screens. We are arguing that in this context the thumbnails are not beneficial, and actually make navigating the screens more difficult than they previously were. YouView absolutely need to add an option to show the recordings and schedule as a list. From an engineering perspective, I'd be very surprised if presenting the data as list is not easier than presenting it as thumbnails. We are not asking for something that is difficult. YouView need to acknowledge that they've made a fundamental mistake, and rectify it as soon as possible.

    Saw it? He's posted the PowerPoint summary slide.  ;)
  • scottscott Member, Super User Posts: 2,134 ✭✭✭
    edited 20 April 2017, 1:29PM
    NickH said:

    I thought I'd try and explain why the use of thumbnail images in the new UI is wrong. Here goes...

    The use of thumbnails has it roots in cover art. Despite being told not to, people do judge books by their cover. In the pre-digital age music albums were recognised by the cover/box of the vinyl/CD. Cinematic films are advertised on billboards by an image that attempts to convey the themes of the film. Cover art is a highly evolved medium and very much a part of life.

    When Apple introduced album cover art to iTunes and the iPod it was pretty cool. Being able to flick through a carousel of images was a neat way to quickly find the album you are looking for. However, there is an underlying assumption that the user will be able to effortlessly recognise the album they're seeking simply from a brief glimpse of an image. Certainly during the period when people were transitioning from owning music on a physical media to digital, people did recognise their favourite albums based purely on the image that was on the front of the CD case.

    The cool cover art approach to browsing your music collection was undoubtedly a great addition, but Apple always retained the option to browse the collection via sorted lists - which could be sorted by many different metadata fields. The aim was to provide the quickest and easiest way to access the collection.

    A critical factor in the success of Apple's album art implementation was responsiveness. The concept worked well because the speed with which the carousel turned was variable. The user could choose to flick through slowly, or they could rapidly move to a much later point. Without the responsiveness the attraction of using the interface is greatly diminished, and would easily become frustrating.

    Browsing a collection by thumbnail images can be extended from music albums to films because the film's title and its artwork are designed to work together. People associate their favourite films with the images that are used to promote them. In addition, people can easily judge the type of film based purely on the image. If they're looking for an action film they know to skip past the one with the image of a cute kitten, or if they don't like horror then the image filled with bloody gore probably isn't for them.

    The use of thumbnails has been extended to previewing written documents, but in this case the usage is very much for preview and navigation within the document. Only in the case when the first page of the document contains the title in large text can a thumbnail be used to represent it – and in that case the thumbnail is simply a pictorial rendering of the text.

    So, in a world when thumbnails are cool and trendy, YouView thought it wise to revamp the MyView Recordings and Schedule screen. Unfortunately they failed to appreciate a fundamental point. The thumbnails are only beneficial if the user, upon first seeing a thumbnail, can effortlessly determine exactly which TV programme it represents. This is not the case. When I record a programme I do not know what thumbnail will be associated with it, therefore when I view the recordings screen the presence of a thumbnail does not allow me to quickly find the programme. I know the title of the programme, and I might know when it was recorded; both pieces of information are much easier to find when presented in a sorted list.

    Proof that the use of thumbnails has been applied without sufficient thought is the fact that the first thumbnail on each page is 4 times the size of the others. Why make the first one larger? It does not have any special status, it is only larger because due to the number of recordings (or scheduled items) it happens to be the first one on a given page. No doubt the layout looked great as a screenshot in a Powerpoint presentation, but in terms of enhancing the usability it is utterly worthless.

    We are not being Luddites by disliking the new Recordings and Schedule screens. We are arguing that in this context the thumbnails are not beneficial, and actually make navigating the screens more difficult than they previously were. YouView absolutely need to add an option to show the recordings and schedule as a list. From an engineering perspective, I'd be very surprised if presenting the data as list is not easier than presenting it as thumbnails. We are not asking for something that is difficult. YouView need to acknowledge that they've made a fundamental mistake, and rectify it as soon as possible.

    If you could just make sure there is hide channels, jump to a specific time and offer HD variant on there...I can sit back and enjoy ;-)
  • JoeJoe Member, Super User Posts: 2,064 ✭✭✭
    edited 23 March 2017, 7:21PM
    NickH said:

    I thought I'd try and explain why the use of thumbnail images in the new UI is wrong. Here goes...

    The use of thumbnails has it roots in cover art. Despite being told not to, people do judge books by their cover. In the pre-digital age music albums were recognised by the cover/box of the vinyl/CD. Cinematic films are advertised on billboards by an image that attempts to convey the themes of the film. Cover art is a highly evolved medium and very much a part of life.

    When Apple introduced album cover art to iTunes and the iPod it was pretty cool. Being able to flick through a carousel of images was a neat way to quickly find the album you are looking for. However, there is an underlying assumption that the user will be able to effortlessly recognise the album they're seeking simply from a brief glimpse of an image. Certainly during the period when people were transitioning from owning music on a physical media to digital, people did recognise their favourite albums based purely on the image that was on the front of the CD case.

    The cool cover art approach to browsing your music collection was undoubtedly a great addition, but Apple always retained the option to browse the collection via sorted lists - which could be sorted by many different metadata fields. The aim was to provide the quickest and easiest way to access the collection.

    A critical factor in the success of Apple's album art implementation was responsiveness. The concept worked well because the speed with which the carousel turned was variable. The user could choose to flick through slowly, or they could rapidly move to a much later point. Without the responsiveness the attraction of using the interface is greatly diminished, and would easily become frustrating.

    Browsing a collection by thumbnail images can be extended from music albums to films because the film's title and its artwork are designed to work together. People associate their favourite films with the images that are used to promote them. In addition, people can easily judge the type of film based purely on the image. If they're looking for an action film they know to skip past the one with the image of a cute kitten, or if they don't like horror then the image filled with bloody gore probably isn't for them.

    The use of thumbnails has been extended to previewing written documents, but in this case the usage is very much for preview and navigation within the document. Only in the case when the first page of the document contains the title in large text can a thumbnail be used to represent it – and in that case the thumbnail is simply a pictorial rendering of the text.

    So, in a world when thumbnails are cool and trendy, YouView thought it wise to revamp the MyView Recordings and Schedule screen. Unfortunately they failed to appreciate a fundamental point. The thumbnails are only beneficial if the user, upon first seeing a thumbnail, can effortlessly determine exactly which TV programme it represents. This is not the case. When I record a programme I do not know what thumbnail will be associated with it, therefore when I view the recordings screen the presence of a thumbnail does not allow me to quickly find the programme. I know the title of the programme, and I might know when it was recorded; both pieces of information are much easier to find when presented in a sorted list.

    Proof that the use of thumbnails has been applied without sufficient thought is the fact that the first thumbnail on each page is 4 times the size of the others. Why make the first one larger? It does not have any special status, it is only larger because due to the number of recordings (or scheduled items) it happens to be the first one on a given page. No doubt the layout looked great as a screenshot in a Powerpoint presentation, but in terms of enhancing the usability it is utterly worthless.

    We are not being Luddites by disliking the new Recordings and Schedule screens. We are arguing that in this context the thumbnails are not beneficial, and actually make navigating the screens more difficult than they previously were. YouView absolutely need to add an option to show the recordings and schedule as a list. From an engineering perspective, I'd be very surprised if presenting the data as list is not easier than presenting it as thumbnails. We are not asking for something that is difficult. YouView need to acknowledge that they've made a fundamental mistake, and rectify it as soon as possible.

    Oops - thought this was just us guys :) Just to clarify to anybody else we are joking, these are my (our) opinions on next gen only.... This message will probably self destruct 
  • JoeJoe Member, Super User Posts: 2,064 ✭✭✭
    edited 23 March 2017, 7:27PM
    NickH said:

    I thought I'd try and explain why the use of thumbnail images in the new UI is wrong. Here goes...

    The use of thumbnails has it roots in cover art. Despite being told not to, people do judge books by their cover. In the pre-digital age music albums were recognised by the cover/box of the vinyl/CD. Cinematic films are advertised on billboards by an image that attempts to convey the themes of the film. Cover art is a highly evolved medium and very much a part of life.

    When Apple introduced album cover art to iTunes and the iPod it was pretty cool. Being able to flick through a carousel of images was a neat way to quickly find the album you are looking for. However, there is an underlying assumption that the user will be able to effortlessly recognise the album they're seeking simply from a brief glimpse of an image. Certainly during the period when people were transitioning from owning music on a physical media to digital, people did recognise their favourite albums based purely on the image that was on the front of the CD case.

    The cool cover art approach to browsing your music collection was undoubtedly a great addition, but Apple always retained the option to browse the collection via sorted lists - which could be sorted by many different metadata fields. The aim was to provide the quickest and easiest way to access the collection.

    A critical factor in the success of Apple's album art implementation was responsiveness. The concept worked well because the speed with which the carousel turned was variable. The user could choose to flick through slowly, or they could rapidly move to a much later point. Without the responsiveness the attraction of using the interface is greatly diminished, and would easily become frustrating.

    Browsing a collection by thumbnail images can be extended from music albums to films because the film's title and its artwork are designed to work together. People associate their favourite films with the images that are used to promote them. In addition, people can easily judge the type of film based purely on the image. If they're looking for an action film they know to skip past the one with the image of a cute kitten, or if they don't like horror then the image filled with bloody gore probably isn't for them.

    The use of thumbnails has been extended to previewing written documents, but in this case the usage is very much for preview and navigation within the document. Only in the case when the first page of the document contains the title in large text can a thumbnail be used to represent it – and in that case the thumbnail is simply a pictorial rendering of the text.

    So, in a world when thumbnails are cool and trendy, YouView thought it wise to revamp the MyView Recordings and Schedule screen. Unfortunately they failed to appreciate a fundamental point. The thumbnails are only beneficial if the user, upon first seeing a thumbnail, can effortlessly determine exactly which TV programme it represents. This is not the case. When I record a programme I do not know what thumbnail will be associated with it, therefore when I view the recordings screen the presence of a thumbnail does not allow me to quickly find the programme. I know the title of the programme, and I might know when it was recorded; both pieces of information are much easier to find when presented in a sorted list.

    Proof that the use of thumbnails has been applied without sufficient thought is the fact that the first thumbnail on each page is 4 times the size of the others. Why make the first one larger? It does not have any special status, it is only larger because due to the number of recordings (or scheduled items) it happens to be the first one on a given page. No doubt the layout looked great as a screenshot in a Powerpoint presentation, but in terms of enhancing the usability it is utterly worthless.

    We are not being Luddites by disliking the new Recordings and Schedule screens. We are arguing that in this context the thumbnails are not beneficial, and actually make navigating the screens more difficult than they previously were. YouView absolutely need to add an option to show the recordings and schedule as a list. From an engineering perspective, I'd be very surprised if presenting the data as list is not easier than presenting it as thumbnails. We are not asking for something that is difficult. YouView need to acknowledge that they've made a fundamental mistake, and rectify it as soon as possible.

    Not a problem scott, Its taken care of.

    By Hd variant do you mean the tv mini guide thingy defaulting to sd channels? That really annoys me because its actually a very useful feature, they've just got the wrong channels. Should be the HD variants 
  • redchizredchiz Member, Super User Posts: 5,433 ✭✭✭
    edited 23 March 2017, 7:27PM
    NickH said:

    I thought I'd try and explain why the use of thumbnail images in the new UI is wrong. Here goes...

    The use of thumbnails has it roots in cover art. Despite being told not to, people do judge books by their cover. In the pre-digital age music albums were recognised by the cover/box of the vinyl/CD. Cinematic films are advertised on billboards by an image that attempts to convey the themes of the film. Cover art is a highly evolved medium and very much a part of life.

    When Apple introduced album cover art to iTunes and the iPod it was pretty cool. Being able to flick through a carousel of images was a neat way to quickly find the album you are looking for. However, there is an underlying assumption that the user will be able to effortlessly recognise the album they're seeking simply from a brief glimpse of an image. Certainly during the period when people were transitioning from owning music on a physical media to digital, people did recognise their favourite albums based purely on the image that was on the front of the CD case.

    The cool cover art approach to browsing your music collection was undoubtedly a great addition, but Apple always retained the option to browse the collection via sorted lists - which could be sorted by many different metadata fields. The aim was to provide the quickest and easiest way to access the collection.

    A critical factor in the success of Apple's album art implementation was responsiveness. The concept worked well because the speed with which the carousel turned was variable. The user could choose to flick through slowly, or they could rapidly move to a much later point. Without the responsiveness the attraction of using the interface is greatly diminished, and would easily become frustrating.

    Browsing a collection by thumbnail images can be extended from music albums to films because the film's title and its artwork are designed to work together. People associate their favourite films with the images that are used to promote them. In addition, people can easily judge the type of film based purely on the image. If they're looking for an action film they know to skip past the one with the image of a cute kitten, or if they don't like horror then the image filled with bloody gore probably isn't for them.

    The use of thumbnails has been extended to previewing written documents, but in this case the usage is very much for preview and navigation within the document. Only in the case when the first page of the document contains the title in large text can a thumbnail be used to represent it – and in that case the thumbnail is simply a pictorial rendering of the text.

    So, in a world when thumbnails are cool and trendy, YouView thought it wise to revamp the MyView Recordings and Schedule screen. Unfortunately they failed to appreciate a fundamental point. The thumbnails are only beneficial if the user, upon first seeing a thumbnail, can effortlessly determine exactly which TV programme it represents. This is not the case. When I record a programme I do not know what thumbnail will be associated with it, therefore when I view the recordings screen the presence of a thumbnail does not allow me to quickly find the programme. I know the title of the programme, and I might know when it was recorded; both pieces of information are much easier to find when presented in a sorted list.

    Proof that the use of thumbnails has been applied without sufficient thought is the fact that the first thumbnail on each page is 4 times the size of the others. Why make the first one larger? It does not have any special status, it is only larger because due to the number of recordings (or scheduled items) it happens to be the first one on a given page. No doubt the layout looked great as a screenshot in a Powerpoint presentation, but in terms of enhancing the usability it is utterly worthless.

    We are not being Luddites by disliking the new Recordings and Schedule screens. We are arguing that in this context the thumbnails are not beneficial, and actually make navigating the screens more difficult than they previously were. YouView absolutely need to add an option to show the recordings and schedule as a list. From an engineering perspective, I'd be very surprised if presenting the data as list is not easier than presenting it as thumbnails. We are not asking for something that is difficult. YouView need to acknowledge that they've made a fundamental mistake, and rectify it as soon as possible.



  • scottscott Member, Super User Posts: 2,134 ✭✭✭
    edited 23 March 2017, 7:27PM
    NickH said:

    I thought I'd try and explain why the use of thumbnail images in the new UI is wrong. Here goes...

    The use of thumbnails has it roots in cover art. Despite being told not to, people do judge books by their cover. In the pre-digital age music albums were recognised by the cover/box of the vinyl/CD. Cinematic films are advertised on billboards by an image that attempts to convey the themes of the film. Cover art is a highly evolved medium and very much a part of life.

    When Apple introduced album cover art to iTunes and the iPod it was pretty cool. Being able to flick through a carousel of images was a neat way to quickly find the album you are looking for. However, there is an underlying assumption that the user will be able to effortlessly recognise the album they're seeking simply from a brief glimpse of an image. Certainly during the period when people were transitioning from owning music on a physical media to digital, people did recognise their favourite albums based purely on the image that was on the front of the CD case.

    The cool cover art approach to browsing your music collection was undoubtedly a great addition, but Apple always retained the option to browse the collection via sorted lists - which could be sorted by many different metadata fields. The aim was to provide the quickest and easiest way to access the collection.

    A critical factor in the success of Apple's album art implementation was responsiveness. The concept worked well because the speed with which the carousel turned was variable. The user could choose to flick through slowly, or they could rapidly move to a much later point. Without the responsiveness the attraction of using the interface is greatly diminished, and would easily become frustrating.

    Browsing a collection by thumbnail images can be extended from music albums to films because the film's title and its artwork are designed to work together. People associate their favourite films with the images that are used to promote them. In addition, people can easily judge the type of film based purely on the image. If they're looking for an action film they know to skip past the one with the image of a cute kitten, or if they don't like horror then the image filled with bloody gore probably isn't for them.

    The use of thumbnails has been extended to previewing written documents, but in this case the usage is very much for preview and navigation within the document. Only in the case when the first page of the document contains the title in large text can a thumbnail be used to represent it – and in that case the thumbnail is simply a pictorial rendering of the text.

    So, in a world when thumbnails are cool and trendy, YouView thought it wise to revamp the MyView Recordings and Schedule screen. Unfortunately they failed to appreciate a fundamental point. The thumbnails are only beneficial if the user, upon first seeing a thumbnail, can effortlessly determine exactly which TV programme it represents. This is not the case. When I record a programme I do not know what thumbnail will be associated with it, therefore when I view the recordings screen the presence of a thumbnail does not allow me to quickly find the programme. I know the title of the programme, and I might know when it was recorded; both pieces of information are much easier to find when presented in a sorted list.

    Proof that the use of thumbnails has been applied without sufficient thought is the fact that the first thumbnail on each page is 4 times the size of the others. Why make the first one larger? It does not have any special status, it is only larger because due to the number of recordings (or scheduled items) it happens to be the first one on a given page. No doubt the layout looked great as a screenshot in a Powerpoint presentation, but in terms of enhancing the usability it is utterly worthless.

    We are not being Luddites by disliking the new Recordings and Schedule screens. We are arguing that in this context the thumbnails are not beneficial, and actually make navigating the screens more difficult than they previously were. YouView absolutely need to add an option to show the recordings and schedule as a list. From an engineering perspective, I'd be very surprised if presenting the data as list is not easier than presenting it as thumbnails. We are not asking for something that is difficult. YouView need to acknowledge that they've made a fundamental mistake, and rectify it as soon as possible.

    Yes. That was something I definitely said would be a good feature because at the minute I feel it is a bit wasted, the other choice is offering a HD shortcut if you pick something in SD and a HD version is available.
  • JoeJoe Member, Super User Posts: 2,064 ✭✭✭
    edited 23 March 2017, 7:36PM
    NickH said:

    I thought I'd try and explain why the use of thumbnail images in the new UI is wrong. Here goes...

    The use of thumbnails has it roots in cover art. Despite being told not to, people do judge books by their cover. In the pre-digital age music albums were recognised by the cover/box of the vinyl/CD. Cinematic films are advertised on billboards by an image that attempts to convey the themes of the film. Cover art is a highly evolved medium and very much a part of life.

    When Apple introduced album cover art to iTunes and the iPod it was pretty cool. Being able to flick through a carousel of images was a neat way to quickly find the album you are looking for. However, there is an underlying assumption that the user will be able to effortlessly recognise the album they're seeking simply from a brief glimpse of an image. Certainly during the period when people were transitioning from owning music on a physical media to digital, people did recognise their favourite albums based purely on the image that was on the front of the CD case.

    The cool cover art approach to browsing your music collection was undoubtedly a great addition, but Apple always retained the option to browse the collection via sorted lists - which could be sorted by many different metadata fields. The aim was to provide the quickest and easiest way to access the collection.

    A critical factor in the success of Apple's album art implementation was responsiveness. The concept worked well because the speed with which the carousel turned was variable. The user could choose to flick through slowly, or they could rapidly move to a much later point. Without the responsiveness the attraction of using the interface is greatly diminished, and would easily become frustrating.

    Browsing a collection by thumbnail images can be extended from music albums to films because the film's title and its artwork are designed to work together. People associate their favourite films with the images that are used to promote them. In addition, people can easily judge the type of film based purely on the image. If they're looking for an action film they know to skip past the one with the image of a cute kitten, or if they don't like horror then the image filled with bloody gore probably isn't for them.

    The use of thumbnails has been extended to previewing written documents, but in this case the usage is very much for preview and navigation within the document. Only in the case when the first page of the document contains the title in large text can a thumbnail be used to represent it – and in that case the thumbnail is simply a pictorial rendering of the text.

    So, in a world when thumbnails are cool and trendy, YouView thought it wise to revamp the MyView Recordings and Schedule screen. Unfortunately they failed to appreciate a fundamental point. The thumbnails are only beneficial if the user, upon first seeing a thumbnail, can effortlessly determine exactly which TV programme it represents. This is not the case. When I record a programme I do not know what thumbnail will be associated with it, therefore when I view the recordings screen the presence of a thumbnail does not allow me to quickly find the programme. I know the title of the programme, and I might know when it was recorded; both pieces of information are much easier to find when presented in a sorted list.

    Proof that the use of thumbnails has been applied without sufficient thought is the fact that the first thumbnail on each page is 4 times the size of the others. Why make the first one larger? It does not have any special status, it is only larger because due to the number of recordings (or scheduled items) it happens to be the first one on a given page. No doubt the layout looked great as a screenshot in a Powerpoint presentation, but in terms of enhancing the usability it is utterly worthless.

    We are not being Luddites by disliking the new Recordings and Schedule screens. We are arguing that in this context the thumbnails are not beneficial, and actually make navigating the screens more difficult than they previously were. YouView absolutely need to add an option to show the recordings and schedule as a list. From an engineering perspective, I'd be very surprised if presenting the data as list is not easier than presenting it as thumbnails. We are not asking for something that is difficult. YouView need to acknowledge that they've made a fundamental mistake, and rectify it as soon as possible.

    Lol redchiz - We've got our best man/squirrel on the job. 

    @scott Yes agreed, its made the potentially brilliant quick/easy access tv mini guide redundant for me. I always have to type in the long winded number to jump to HD.
  • scottscott Member, Super User Posts: 2,134 ✭✭✭
    edited 23 March 2017, 8:04PM
    NickH said:

    I thought I'd try and explain why the use of thumbnail images in the new UI is wrong. Here goes...

    The use of thumbnails has it roots in cover art. Despite being told not to, people do judge books by their cover. In the pre-digital age music albums were recognised by the cover/box of the vinyl/CD. Cinematic films are advertised on billboards by an image that attempts to convey the themes of the film. Cover art is a highly evolved medium and very much a part of life.

    When Apple introduced album cover art to iTunes and the iPod it was pretty cool. Being able to flick through a carousel of images was a neat way to quickly find the album you are looking for. However, there is an underlying assumption that the user will be able to effortlessly recognise the album they're seeking simply from a brief glimpse of an image. Certainly during the period when people were transitioning from owning music on a physical media to digital, people did recognise their favourite albums based purely on the image that was on the front of the CD case.

    The cool cover art approach to browsing your music collection was undoubtedly a great addition, but Apple always retained the option to browse the collection via sorted lists - which could be sorted by many different metadata fields. The aim was to provide the quickest and easiest way to access the collection.

    A critical factor in the success of Apple's album art implementation was responsiveness. The concept worked well because the speed with which the carousel turned was variable. The user could choose to flick through slowly, or they could rapidly move to a much later point. Without the responsiveness the attraction of using the interface is greatly diminished, and would easily become frustrating.

    Browsing a collection by thumbnail images can be extended from music albums to films because the film's title and its artwork are designed to work together. People associate their favourite films with the images that are used to promote them. In addition, people can easily judge the type of film based purely on the image. If they're looking for an action film they know to skip past the one with the image of a cute kitten, or if they don't like horror then the image filled with bloody gore probably isn't for them.

    The use of thumbnails has been extended to previewing written documents, but in this case the usage is very much for preview and navigation within the document. Only in the case when the first page of the document contains the title in large text can a thumbnail be used to represent it – and in that case the thumbnail is simply a pictorial rendering of the text.

    So, in a world when thumbnails are cool and trendy, YouView thought it wise to revamp the MyView Recordings and Schedule screen. Unfortunately they failed to appreciate a fundamental point. The thumbnails are only beneficial if the user, upon first seeing a thumbnail, can effortlessly determine exactly which TV programme it represents. This is not the case. When I record a programme I do not know what thumbnail will be associated with it, therefore when I view the recordings screen the presence of a thumbnail does not allow me to quickly find the programme. I know the title of the programme, and I might know when it was recorded; both pieces of information are much easier to find when presented in a sorted list.

    Proof that the use of thumbnails has been applied without sufficient thought is the fact that the first thumbnail on each page is 4 times the size of the others. Why make the first one larger? It does not have any special status, it is only larger because due to the number of recordings (or scheduled items) it happens to be the first one on a given page. No doubt the layout looked great as a screenshot in a Powerpoint presentation, but in terms of enhancing the usability it is utterly worthless.

    We are not being Luddites by disliking the new Recordings and Schedule screens. We are arguing that in this context the thumbnails are not beneficial, and actually make navigating the screens more difficult than they previously were. YouView absolutely need to add an option to show the recordings and schedule as a list. From an engineering perspective, I'd be very surprised if presenting the data as list is not easier than presenting it as thumbnails. We are not asking for something that is difficult. YouView need to acknowledge that they've made a fundamental mistake, and rectify it as soon as possible.

    @Joe - totally agree, its ok for a quick glance at what's on but never select them because never watch anything in SD now..if you could choose them to be the HD variant it would be very good, especially as in the BT variant the fifth tile alternates between BT Sport 1 and AMC so it shows the potential..
  • VisionmanVisionman Member, Super User Posts: 10,293 ✭✭✭
    edited 23 March 2017, 8:04PM
    NickH said:

    I thought I'd try and explain why the use of thumbnail images in the new UI is wrong. Here goes...

    The use of thumbnails has it roots in cover art. Despite being told not to, people do judge books by their cover. In the pre-digital age music albums were recognised by the cover/box of the vinyl/CD. Cinematic films are advertised on billboards by an image that attempts to convey the themes of the film. Cover art is a highly evolved medium and very much a part of life.

    When Apple introduced album cover art to iTunes and the iPod it was pretty cool. Being able to flick through a carousel of images was a neat way to quickly find the album you are looking for. However, there is an underlying assumption that the user will be able to effortlessly recognise the album they're seeking simply from a brief glimpse of an image. Certainly during the period when people were transitioning from owning music on a physical media to digital, people did recognise their favourite albums based purely on the image that was on the front of the CD case.

    The cool cover art approach to browsing your music collection was undoubtedly a great addition, but Apple always retained the option to browse the collection via sorted lists - which could be sorted by many different metadata fields. The aim was to provide the quickest and easiest way to access the collection.

    A critical factor in the success of Apple's album art implementation was responsiveness. The concept worked well because the speed with which the carousel turned was variable. The user could choose to flick through slowly, or they could rapidly move to a much later point. Without the responsiveness the attraction of using the interface is greatly diminished, and would easily become frustrating.

    Browsing a collection by thumbnail images can be extended from music albums to films because the film's title and its artwork are designed to work together. People associate their favourite films with the images that are used to promote them. In addition, people can easily judge the type of film based purely on the image. If they're looking for an action film they know to skip past the one with the image of a cute kitten, or if they don't like horror then the image filled with bloody gore probably isn't for them.

    The use of thumbnails has been extended to previewing written documents, but in this case the usage is very much for preview and navigation within the document. Only in the case when the first page of the document contains the title in large text can a thumbnail be used to represent it – and in that case the thumbnail is simply a pictorial rendering of the text.

    So, in a world when thumbnails are cool and trendy, YouView thought it wise to revamp the MyView Recordings and Schedule screen. Unfortunately they failed to appreciate a fundamental point. The thumbnails are only beneficial if the user, upon first seeing a thumbnail, can effortlessly determine exactly which TV programme it represents. This is not the case. When I record a programme I do not know what thumbnail will be associated with it, therefore when I view the recordings screen the presence of a thumbnail does not allow me to quickly find the programme. I know the title of the programme, and I might know when it was recorded; both pieces of information are much easier to find when presented in a sorted list.

    Proof that the use of thumbnails has been applied without sufficient thought is the fact that the first thumbnail on each page is 4 times the size of the others. Why make the first one larger? It does not have any special status, it is only larger because due to the number of recordings (or scheduled items) it happens to be the first one on a given page. No doubt the layout looked great as a screenshot in a Powerpoint presentation, but in terms of enhancing the usability it is utterly worthless.

    We are not being Luddites by disliking the new Recordings and Schedule screens. We are arguing that in this context the thumbnails are not beneficial, and actually make navigating the screens more difficult than they previously were. YouView absolutely need to add an option to show the recordings and schedule as a list. From an engineering perspective, I'd be very surprised if presenting the data as list is not easier than presenting it as thumbnails. We are not asking for something that is difficult. YouView need to acknowledge that they've made a fundamental mistake, and rectify it as soon as possible.

    Does it? As it doesn't offer HD variants I've never paid much attention to it. Until reading this short burst of comments.
    I'm now happy with the disagree icon, because its gone.
  • jimbjimb Member, Super User Posts: 1,412 ✭✭✭
    edited 23 March 2017, 8:11PM
    NickH said:

    I thought I'd try and explain why the use of thumbnail images in the new UI is wrong. Here goes...

    The use of thumbnails has it roots in cover art. Despite being told not to, people do judge books by their cover. In the pre-digital age music albums were recognised by the cover/box of the vinyl/CD. Cinematic films are advertised on billboards by an image that attempts to convey the themes of the film. Cover art is a highly evolved medium and very much a part of life.

    When Apple introduced album cover art to iTunes and the iPod it was pretty cool. Being able to flick through a carousel of images was a neat way to quickly find the album you are looking for. However, there is an underlying assumption that the user will be able to effortlessly recognise the album they're seeking simply from a brief glimpse of an image. Certainly during the period when people were transitioning from owning music on a physical media to digital, people did recognise their favourite albums based purely on the image that was on the front of the CD case.

    The cool cover art approach to browsing your music collection was undoubtedly a great addition, but Apple always retained the option to browse the collection via sorted lists - which could be sorted by many different metadata fields. The aim was to provide the quickest and easiest way to access the collection.

    A critical factor in the success of Apple's album art implementation was responsiveness. The concept worked well because the speed with which the carousel turned was variable. The user could choose to flick through slowly, or they could rapidly move to a much later point. Without the responsiveness the attraction of using the interface is greatly diminished, and would easily become frustrating.

    Browsing a collection by thumbnail images can be extended from music albums to films because the film's title and its artwork are designed to work together. People associate their favourite films with the images that are used to promote them. In addition, people can easily judge the type of film based purely on the image. If they're looking for an action film they know to skip past the one with the image of a cute kitten, or if they don't like horror then the image filled with bloody gore probably isn't for them.

    The use of thumbnails has been extended to previewing written documents, but in this case the usage is very much for preview and navigation within the document. Only in the case when the first page of the document contains the title in large text can a thumbnail be used to represent it – and in that case the thumbnail is simply a pictorial rendering of the text.

    So, in a world when thumbnails are cool and trendy, YouView thought it wise to revamp the MyView Recordings and Schedule screen. Unfortunately they failed to appreciate a fundamental point. The thumbnails are only beneficial if the user, upon first seeing a thumbnail, can effortlessly determine exactly which TV programme it represents. This is not the case. When I record a programme I do not know what thumbnail will be associated with it, therefore when I view the recordings screen the presence of a thumbnail does not allow me to quickly find the programme. I know the title of the programme, and I might know when it was recorded; both pieces of information are much easier to find when presented in a sorted list.

    Proof that the use of thumbnails has been applied without sufficient thought is the fact that the first thumbnail on each page is 4 times the size of the others. Why make the first one larger? It does not have any special status, it is only larger because due to the number of recordings (or scheduled items) it happens to be the first one on a given page. No doubt the layout looked great as a screenshot in a Powerpoint presentation, but in terms of enhancing the usability it is utterly worthless.

    We are not being Luddites by disliking the new Recordings and Schedule screens. We are arguing that in this context the thumbnails are not beneficial, and actually make navigating the screens more difficult than they previously were. YouView absolutely need to add an option to show the recordings and schedule as a list. From an engineering perspective, I'd be very surprised if presenting the data as list is not easier than presenting it as thumbnails. We are not asking for something that is difficult. YouView need to acknowledge that they've made a fundamental mistake, and rectify it as soon as possible.

    I think one of the few good things about the Freeview Play box I tried some time ago was that if you chose to watch an SD channel when an HD version was available, a message popped up saying "Watch in HD?"
    A very simple idea and in my opinion very useful.
  • Dave DriverDave Driver Member Posts: 32
    edited 23 March 2017, 8:14PM
    NickH said:

    I thought I'd try and explain why the use of thumbnail images in the new UI is wrong. Here goes...

    The use of thumbnails has it roots in cover art. Despite being told not to, people do judge books by their cover. In the pre-digital age music albums were recognised by the cover/box of the vinyl/CD. Cinematic films are advertised on billboards by an image that attempts to convey the themes of the film. Cover art is a highly evolved medium and very much a part of life.

    When Apple introduced album cover art to iTunes and the iPod it was pretty cool. Being able to flick through a carousel of images was a neat way to quickly find the album you are looking for. However, there is an underlying assumption that the user will be able to effortlessly recognise the album they're seeking simply from a brief glimpse of an image. Certainly during the period when people were transitioning from owning music on a physical media to digital, people did recognise their favourite albums based purely on the image that was on the front of the CD case.

    The cool cover art approach to browsing your music collection was undoubtedly a great addition, but Apple always retained the option to browse the collection via sorted lists - which could be sorted by many different metadata fields. The aim was to provide the quickest and easiest way to access the collection.

    A critical factor in the success of Apple's album art implementation was responsiveness. The concept worked well because the speed with which the carousel turned was variable. The user could choose to flick through slowly, or they could rapidly move to a much later point. Without the responsiveness the attraction of using the interface is greatly diminished, and would easily become frustrating.

    Browsing a collection by thumbnail images can be extended from music albums to films because the film's title and its artwork are designed to work together. People associate their favourite films with the images that are used to promote them. In addition, people can easily judge the type of film based purely on the image. If they're looking for an action film they know to skip past the one with the image of a cute kitten, or if they don't like horror then the image filled with bloody gore probably isn't for them.

    The use of thumbnails has been extended to previewing written documents, but in this case the usage is very much for preview and navigation within the document. Only in the case when the first page of the document contains the title in large text can a thumbnail be used to represent it – and in that case the thumbnail is simply a pictorial rendering of the text.

    So, in a world when thumbnails are cool and trendy, YouView thought it wise to revamp the MyView Recordings and Schedule screen. Unfortunately they failed to appreciate a fundamental point. The thumbnails are only beneficial if the user, upon first seeing a thumbnail, can effortlessly determine exactly which TV programme it represents. This is not the case. When I record a programme I do not know what thumbnail will be associated with it, therefore when I view the recordings screen the presence of a thumbnail does not allow me to quickly find the programme. I know the title of the programme, and I might know when it was recorded; both pieces of information are much easier to find when presented in a sorted list.

    Proof that the use of thumbnails has been applied without sufficient thought is the fact that the first thumbnail on each page is 4 times the size of the others. Why make the first one larger? It does not have any special status, it is only larger because due to the number of recordings (or scheduled items) it happens to be the first one on a given page. No doubt the layout looked great as a screenshot in a Powerpoint presentation, but in terms of enhancing the usability it is utterly worthless.

    We are not being Luddites by disliking the new Recordings and Schedule screens. We are arguing that in this context the thumbnails are not beneficial, and actually make navigating the screens more difficult than they previously were. YouView absolutely need to add an option to show the recordings and schedule as a list. From an engineering perspective, I'd be very surprised if presenting the data as list is not easier than presenting it as thumbnails. We are not asking for something that is difficult. YouView need to acknowledge that they've made a fundamental mistake, and rectify it as soon as possible.

    I had a box that did exactly that. Until very recently. My Humax Youview box.
  • VisionmanVisionman Member, Super User Posts: 10,293 ✭✭✭
    edited 23 March 2017, 8:20PM
    NickH said:

    I thought I'd try and explain why the use of thumbnail images in the new UI is wrong. Here goes...

    The use of thumbnails has it roots in cover art. Despite being told not to, people do judge books by their cover. In the pre-digital age music albums were recognised by the cover/box of the vinyl/CD. Cinematic films are advertised on billboards by an image that attempts to convey the themes of the film. Cover art is a highly evolved medium and very much a part of life.

    When Apple introduced album cover art to iTunes and the iPod it was pretty cool. Being able to flick through a carousel of images was a neat way to quickly find the album you are looking for. However, there is an underlying assumption that the user will be able to effortlessly recognise the album they're seeking simply from a brief glimpse of an image. Certainly during the period when people were transitioning from owning music on a physical media to digital, people did recognise their favourite albums based purely on the image that was on the front of the CD case.

    The cool cover art approach to browsing your music collection was undoubtedly a great addition, but Apple always retained the option to browse the collection via sorted lists - which could be sorted by many different metadata fields. The aim was to provide the quickest and easiest way to access the collection.

    A critical factor in the success of Apple's album art implementation was responsiveness. The concept worked well because the speed with which the carousel turned was variable. The user could choose to flick through slowly, or they could rapidly move to a much later point. Without the responsiveness the attraction of using the interface is greatly diminished, and would easily become frustrating.

    Browsing a collection by thumbnail images can be extended from music albums to films because the film's title and its artwork are designed to work together. People associate their favourite films with the images that are used to promote them. In addition, people can easily judge the type of film based purely on the image. If they're looking for an action film they know to skip past the one with the image of a cute kitten, or if they don't like horror then the image filled with bloody gore probably isn't for them.

    The use of thumbnails has been extended to previewing written documents, but in this case the usage is very much for preview and navigation within the document. Only in the case when the first page of the document contains the title in large text can a thumbnail be used to represent it – and in that case the thumbnail is simply a pictorial rendering of the text.

    So, in a world when thumbnails are cool and trendy, YouView thought it wise to revamp the MyView Recordings and Schedule screen. Unfortunately they failed to appreciate a fundamental point. The thumbnails are only beneficial if the user, upon first seeing a thumbnail, can effortlessly determine exactly which TV programme it represents. This is not the case. When I record a programme I do not know what thumbnail will be associated with it, therefore when I view the recordings screen the presence of a thumbnail does not allow me to quickly find the programme. I know the title of the programme, and I might know when it was recorded; both pieces of information are much easier to find when presented in a sorted list.

    Proof that the use of thumbnails has been applied without sufficient thought is the fact that the first thumbnail on each page is 4 times the size of the others. Why make the first one larger? It does not have any special status, it is only larger because due to the number of recordings (or scheduled items) it happens to be the first one on a given page. No doubt the layout looked great as a screenshot in a Powerpoint presentation, but in terms of enhancing the usability it is utterly worthless.

    We are not being Luddites by disliking the new Recordings and Schedule screens. We are arguing that in this context the thumbnails are not beneficial, and actually make navigating the screens more difficult than they previously were. YouView absolutely need to add an option to show the recordings and schedule as a list. From an engineering perspective, I'd be very surprised if presenting the data as list is not easier than presenting it as thumbnails. We are not asking for something that is difficult. YouView need to acknowledge that they've made a fundamental mistake, and rectify it as soon as possible.

    As far as I can recall, that was/is only available on BBC channels. As only the BBC offer an SD/HD option, where such content is available. I don't know why. If I'm wrong I'd love to be corrected.
    I'm now happy with the disagree icon, because its gone.
  • JoeJoe Member, Super User Posts: 2,064 ✭✭✭
    edited 23 March 2017, 8:38PM
    NickH said:

    I thought I'd try and explain why the use of thumbnail images in the new UI is wrong. Here goes...

    The use of thumbnails has it roots in cover art. Despite being told not to, people do judge books by their cover. In the pre-digital age music albums were recognised by the cover/box of the vinyl/CD. Cinematic films are advertised on billboards by an image that attempts to convey the themes of the film. Cover art is a highly evolved medium and very much a part of life.

    When Apple introduced album cover art to iTunes and the iPod it was pretty cool. Being able to flick through a carousel of images was a neat way to quickly find the album you are looking for. However, there is an underlying assumption that the user will be able to effortlessly recognise the album they're seeking simply from a brief glimpse of an image. Certainly during the period when people were transitioning from owning music on a physical media to digital, people did recognise their favourite albums based purely on the image that was on the front of the CD case.

    The cool cover art approach to browsing your music collection was undoubtedly a great addition, but Apple always retained the option to browse the collection via sorted lists - which could be sorted by many different metadata fields. The aim was to provide the quickest and easiest way to access the collection.

    A critical factor in the success of Apple's album art implementation was responsiveness. The concept worked well because the speed with which the carousel turned was variable. The user could choose to flick through slowly, or they could rapidly move to a much later point. Without the responsiveness the attraction of using the interface is greatly diminished, and would easily become frustrating.

    Browsing a collection by thumbnail images can be extended from music albums to films because the film's title and its artwork are designed to work together. People associate their favourite films with the images that are used to promote them. In addition, people can easily judge the type of film based purely on the image. If they're looking for an action film they know to skip past the one with the image of a cute kitten, or if they don't like horror then the image filled with bloody gore probably isn't for them.

    The use of thumbnails has been extended to previewing written documents, but in this case the usage is very much for preview and navigation within the document. Only in the case when the first page of the document contains the title in large text can a thumbnail be used to represent it – and in that case the thumbnail is simply a pictorial rendering of the text.

    So, in a world when thumbnails are cool and trendy, YouView thought it wise to revamp the MyView Recordings and Schedule screen. Unfortunately they failed to appreciate a fundamental point. The thumbnails are only beneficial if the user, upon first seeing a thumbnail, can effortlessly determine exactly which TV programme it represents. This is not the case. When I record a programme I do not know what thumbnail will be associated with it, therefore when I view the recordings screen the presence of a thumbnail does not allow me to quickly find the programme. I know the title of the programme, and I might know when it was recorded; both pieces of information are much easier to find when presented in a sorted list.

    Proof that the use of thumbnails has been applied without sufficient thought is the fact that the first thumbnail on each page is 4 times the size of the others. Why make the first one larger? It does not have any special status, it is only larger because due to the number of recordings (or scheduled items) it happens to be the first one on a given page. No doubt the layout looked great as a screenshot in a Powerpoint presentation, but in terms of enhancing the usability it is utterly worthless.

    We are not being Luddites by disliking the new Recordings and Schedule screens. We are arguing that in this context the thumbnails are not beneficial, and actually make navigating the screens more difficult than they previously were. YouView absolutely need to add an option to show the recordings and schedule as a list. From an engineering perspective, I'd be very surprised if presenting the data as list is not easier than presenting it as thumbnails. We are not asking for something that is difficult. YouView need to acknowledge that they've made a fundamental mistake, and rectify it as soon as possible.

    Yes that was useful, but only available on bbc channels,if memory serves
  • Dave DriverDave Driver Member Posts: 32
    edited 23 March 2017, 9:40PM
    NickH said:

    I thought I'd try and explain why the use of thumbnail images in the new UI is wrong. Here goes...

    The use of thumbnails has it roots in cover art. Despite being told not to, people do judge books by their cover. In the pre-digital age music albums were recognised by the cover/box of the vinyl/CD. Cinematic films are advertised on billboards by an image that attempts to convey the themes of the film. Cover art is a highly evolved medium and very much a part of life.

    When Apple introduced album cover art to iTunes and the iPod it was pretty cool. Being able to flick through a carousel of images was a neat way to quickly find the album you are looking for. However, there is an underlying assumption that the user will be able to effortlessly recognise the album they're seeking simply from a brief glimpse of an image. Certainly during the period when people were transitioning from owning music on a physical media to digital, people did recognise their favourite albums based purely on the image that was on the front of the CD case.

    The cool cover art approach to browsing your music collection was undoubtedly a great addition, but Apple always retained the option to browse the collection via sorted lists - which could be sorted by many different metadata fields. The aim was to provide the quickest and easiest way to access the collection.

    A critical factor in the success of Apple's album art implementation was responsiveness. The concept worked well because the speed with which the carousel turned was variable. The user could choose to flick through slowly, or they could rapidly move to a much later point. Without the responsiveness the attraction of using the interface is greatly diminished, and would easily become frustrating.

    Browsing a collection by thumbnail images can be extended from music albums to films because the film's title and its artwork are designed to work together. People associate their favourite films with the images that are used to promote them. In addition, people can easily judge the type of film based purely on the image. If they're looking for an action film they know to skip past the one with the image of a cute kitten, or if they don't like horror then the image filled with bloody gore probably isn't for them.

    The use of thumbnails has been extended to previewing written documents, but in this case the usage is very much for preview and navigation within the document. Only in the case when the first page of the document contains the title in large text can a thumbnail be used to represent it – and in that case the thumbnail is simply a pictorial rendering of the text.

    So, in a world when thumbnails are cool and trendy, YouView thought it wise to revamp the MyView Recordings and Schedule screen. Unfortunately they failed to appreciate a fundamental point. The thumbnails are only beneficial if the user, upon first seeing a thumbnail, can effortlessly determine exactly which TV programme it represents. This is not the case. When I record a programme I do not know what thumbnail will be associated with it, therefore when I view the recordings screen the presence of a thumbnail does not allow me to quickly find the programme. I know the title of the programme, and I might know when it was recorded; both pieces of information are much easier to find when presented in a sorted list.

    Proof that the use of thumbnails has been applied without sufficient thought is the fact that the first thumbnail on each page is 4 times the size of the others. Why make the first one larger? It does not have any special status, it is only larger because due to the number of recordings (or scheduled items) it happens to be the first one on a given page. No doubt the layout looked great as a screenshot in a Powerpoint presentation, but in terms of enhancing the usability it is utterly worthless.

    We are not being Luddites by disliking the new Recordings and Schedule screens. We are arguing that in this context the thumbnails are not beneficial, and actually make navigating the screens more difficult than they previously were. YouView absolutely need to add an option to show the recordings and schedule as a list. From an engineering perspective, I'd be very surprised if presenting the data as list is not easier than presenting it as thumbnails. We are not asking for something that is difficult. YouView need to acknowledge that they've made a fundamental mistake, and rectify it as soon as possible.

    Currently a bit irrelevant to me anyway. As my aerial points up in the air after a storm about 5 years ago, my signal isn't good enough for HD so rather than fix the aerial I have just put up with SD instead.
  • Yasha NokeYasha Noke Member Posts: 318 ✭✭
    edited 23 March 2017, 11:03PM
    NickH said:

    I thought I'd try and explain why the use of thumbnail images in the new UI is wrong. Here goes...

    The use of thumbnails has it roots in cover art. Despite being told not to, people do judge books by their cover. In the pre-digital age music albums were recognised by the cover/box of the vinyl/CD. Cinematic films are advertised on billboards by an image that attempts to convey the themes of the film. Cover art is a highly evolved medium and very much a part of life.

    When Apple introduced album cover art to iTunes and the iPod it was pretty cool. Being able to flick through a carousel of images was a neat way to quickly find the album you are looking for. However, there is an underlying assumption that the user will be able to effortlessly recognise the album they're seeking simply from a brief glimpse of an image. Certainly during the period when people were transitioning from owning music on a physical media to digital, people did recognise their favourite albums based purely on the image that was on the front of the CD case.

    The cool cover art approach to browsing your music collection was undoubtedly a great addition, but Apple always retained the option to browse the collection via sorted lists - which could be sorted by many different metadata fields. The aim was to provide the quickest and easiest way to access the collection.

    A critical factor in the success of Apple's album art implementation was responsiveness. The concept worked well because the speed with which the carousel turned was variable. The user could choose to flick through slowly, or they could rapidly move to a much later point. Without the responsiveness the attraction of using the interface is greatly diminished, and would easily become frustrating.

    Browsing a collection by thumbnail images can be extended from music albums to films because the film's title and its artwork are designed to work together. People associate their favourite films with the images that are used to promote them. In addition, people can easily judge the type of film based purely on the image. If they're looking for an action film they know to skip past the one with the image of a cute kitten, or if they don't like horror then the image filled with bloody gore probably isn't for them.

    The use of thumbnails has been extended to previewing written documents, but in this case the usage is very much for preview and navigation within the document. Only in the case when the first page of the document contains the title in large text can a thumbnail be used to represent it – and in that case the thumbnail is simply a pictorial rendering of the text.

    So, in a world when thumbnails are cool and trendy, YouView thought it wise to revamp the MyView Recordings and Schedule screen. Unfortunately they failed to appreciate a fundamental point. The thumbnails are only beneficial if the user, upon first seeing a thumbnail, can effortlessly determine exactly which TV programme it represents. This is not the case. When I record a programme I do not know what thumbnail will be associated with it, therefore when I view the recordings screen the presence of a thumbnail does not allow me to quickly find the programme. I know the title of the programme, and I might know when it was recorded; both pieces of information are much easier to find when presented in a sorted list.

    Proof that the use of thumbnails has been applied without sufficient thought is the fact that the first thumbnail on each page is 4 times the size of the others. Why make the first one larger? It does not have any special status, it is only larger because due to the number of recordings (or scheduled items) it happens to be the first one on a given page. No doubt the layout looked great as a screenshot in a Powerpoint presentation, but in terms of enhancing the usability it is utterly worthless.

    We are not being Luddites by disliking the new Recordings and Schedule screens. We are arguing that in this context the thumbnails are not beneficial, and actually make navigating the screens more difficult than they previously were. YouView absolutely need to add an option to show the recordings and schedule as a list. From an engineering perspective, I'd be very surprised if presenting the data as list is not easier than presenting it as thumbnails. We are not asking for something that is difficult. YouView need to acknowledge that they've made a fundamental mistake, and rectify it as soon as possible.

    @Visionman and @Joe
    The Channel 5 group also supplies the metadata that enables offering "an SD/HD option, where such content is available".
  • JoeJoe Member, Super User Posts: 2,064 ✭✭✭
    edited 23 March 2017, 11:00PM
    NickH said:

    I thought I'd try and explain why the use of thumbnail images in the new UI is wrong. Here goes...

    The use of thumbnails has it roots in cover art. Despite being told not to, people do judge books by their cover. In the pre-digital age music albums were recognised by the cover/box of the vinyl/CD. Cinematic films are advertised on billboards by an image that attempts to convey the themes of the film. Cover art is a highly evolved medium and very much a part of life.

    When Apple introduced album cover art to iTunes and the iPod it was pretty cool. Being able to flick through a carousel of images was a neat way to quickly find the album you are looking for. However, there is an underlying assumption that the user will be able to effortlessly recognise the album they're seeking simply from a brief glimpse of an image. Certainly during the period when people were transitioning from owning music on a physical media to digital, people did recognise their favourite albums based purely on the image that was on the front of the CD case.

    The cool cover art approach to browsing your music collection was undoubtedly a great addition, but Apple always retained the option to browse the collection via sorted lists - which could be sorted by many different metadata fields. The aim was to provide the quickest and easiest way to access the collection.

    A critical factor in the success of Apple's album art implementation was responsiveness. The concept worked well because the speed with which the carousel turned was variable. The user could choose to flick through slowly, or they could rapidly move to a much later point. Without the responsiveness the attraction of using the interface is greatly diminished, and would easily become frustrating.

    Browsing a collection by thumbnail images can be extended from music albums to films because the film's title and its artwork are designed to work together. People associate their favourite films with the images that are used to promote them. In addition, people can easily judge the type of film based purely on the image. If they're looking for an action film they know to skip past the one with the image of a cute kitten, or if they don't like horror then the image filled with bloody gore probably isn't for them.

    The use of thumbnails has been extended to previewing written documents, but in this case the usage is very much for preview and navigation within the document. Only in the case when the first page of the document contains the title in large text can a thumbnail be used to represent it – and in that case the thumbnail is simply a pictorial rendering of the text.

    So, in a world when thumbnails are cool and trendy, YouView thought it wise to revamp the MyView Recordings and Schedule screen. Unfortunately they failed to appreciate a fundamental point. The thumbnails are only beneficial if the user, upon first seeing a thumbnail, can effortlessly determine exactly which TV programme it represents. This is not the case. When I record a programme I do not know what thumbnail will be associated with it, therefore when I view the recordings screen the presence of a thumbnail does not allow me to quickly find the programme. I know the title of the programme, and I might know when it was recorded; both pieces of information are much easier to find when presented in a sorted list.

    Proof that the use of thumbnails has been applied without sufficient thought is the fact that the first thumbnail on each page is 4 times the size of the others. Why make the first one larger? It does not have any special status, it is only larger because due to the number of recordings (or scheduled items) it happens to be the first one on a given page. No doubt the layout looked great as a screenshot in a Powerpoint presentation, but in terms of enhancing the usability it is utterly worthless.

    We are not being Luddites by disliking the new Recordings and Schedule screens. We are arguing that in this context the thumbnails are not beneficial, and actually make navigating the screens more difficult than they previously were. YouView absolutely need to add an option to show the recordings and schedule as a list. From an engineering perspective, I'd be very surprised if presenting the data as list is not easier than presenting it as thumbnails. We are not asking for something that is difficult. YouView need to acknowledge that they've made a fundamental mistake, and rectify it as soon as possible.

    Thanks for the clarification Yasha Noke. I wasn't 100% sure.
  • johnnoprobjohnnoprob Member Posts: 5
    edited 24 March 2017, 10:22AM

    I emailed YV viewer support & this is their response as written.

    I’m sorry to hear that you are unhappy with new update. I can certainly understand how frustrating it is especially since you prefer what it looked like before.

    The new software was trialled on a number of YouView users including us here at the YouView technical support team, before it was released. The trialists not only helped weed out any problems with the update but delivered feedback for improvements they deemed necessary.

    We have had a lot of feedback, most of which is positive, some of which is negative. However we do value your feedback and I’ll be happy to pass it on tot he relative team for you.

    As this update is not just physically or visually different, and it is actually a lot more to do with how YouView works on a whole, there is no way to permanently undo it. YouView as a service is changing, meaning that boxes all across the country will work faster and more efficiently and with less problems including:

    The new UI (User Interface) is more intuitive and easy to use

    The UI allows the user to see content before selecting the show or series

    Less clicking and more watching

    Great content discovery with a visual, simple, seamless and non-intrusive user experience across the system

    A faster playback experience on Live, IP channels and On Demand

    Less clicking and more watching with a new visual Main Menu from which viewers can launch all of our services

    Quicker access to viewers favourite Players and Apps with more now visible on the UI

    A full screen, faster Guide allowing viewers to watch, record or catch up on the content they love

    A new visual Mini-Guide, accessible from the playback bar, allowing viewers to catch up with what was on and see what’s on now, on next and in the future

    A personal TV library of recordings with the new MyTV, formally MyView, where viewers can see more recordings This is all in addition to the great features YouView already has including trick play functionality, 7 day scroll back, Record and Reminders, Search and Accessibility Features.

    I understand that it does look different, and that all changes require a little bit of getting used to, but hopefully you will get the hang of it and the visuals are not not too hard to look past. I hope that this is not too upsetting for you.

    I hope this information has helped you today. However if you do have any more queries you can either reply to this email or please don't hesitate to give me a call on 0333 313 2278. Lines are open Monday – Saturday, 10am - 8pm, and Sundays 10am - 5pm. If you ask for me personally I will be more than happy to help.

    Kind Regards,
    Kieran
    The YouView Support Team.

    Exactly - it is not about the user but about Youview going the way of all the 'service providers' such as Google, who make all their revenue from selling targetted advertising. The box is now a browswer, whose content is entirely determined by Youview and their advertisers.. The Freeview concept was hijacked some years ago because it could not get enough revenue.
  • clprattclpratt Member Posts: 8
    edited 24 March 2017, 3:59PM

    It's very disappointing that no-one from YouView is responding to all these comments. Presumably you set up this thread because you intended to read what people have to say about the software change (I don't think we should call this an "upgrade"). It really should be clear to you by now that:

    - The change has been a disaster. Customer response is overwhelmingly negative. To the extent you did any consultation/research before implementing this change then it was sadly inadequate. If a small bunch of people told you this was a "good idea" then the likelihood is they were secretly working for Sky.

    - The customers are not simply a bunch of conservative philistines resistant to any sort of change. We like change if it is an improvement, but people don't like this because it is materially worse than what went before. The comparison to Windows 8 is spot on.

    - It's so bad that it will threaten the ongoing popularity of YouView. I chose it after careful thought because it was the best platform. This is no longer the case. You can't afford to behave like this when others are upping their game.

    Please could someone from YouView respond to all these comments and confirm when and how we can reverse this change and get back the platform which had virtually nothing wrong with it?

    I have a Humax DTR T1000 which has recently updated to 27.46.0.
    I have three functions, additional to those mentioned by others users, that don't work correctly.

    1: When I play a recording that says it has 2 episodes, I then delete the episode I have just watched and click back to see that the tile still says there are 2 episodes. Only when I navigate to another tile and back does the tile number of episodes refresh.

    2: Skip does not auto repeat when the key is held down. It used to on the old software. Please reinstate.

    3: I often use skip back to the start of a programme to get it ready to rewatch from the start.
    When I pause, then skip back the player still stays paused.
    But if the skip reaches the beginning, i.e. time 00.00, pause is cancelled and the programme runs so I have to push pause again.

    Is there an official contact where we can tell the designers of this software what we think of it and the bugs we are finding?
  • caroline2caroline2 Member Posts: 3
    edited 2 April 2017, 9:07PM

    It's very disappointing that no-one from YouView is responding to all these comments. Presumably you set up this thread because you intended to read what people have to say about the software change (I don't think we should call this an "upgrade"). It really should be clear to you by now that:

    - The change has been a disaster. Customer response is overwhelmingly negative. To the extent you did any consultation/research before implementing this change then it was sadly inadequate. If a small bunch of people told you this was a "good idea" then the likelihood is they were secretly working for Sky.

    - The customers are not simply a bunch of conservative philistines resistant to any sort of change. We like change if it is an improvement, but people don't like this because it is materially worse than what went before. The comparison to Windows 8 is spot on.

    - It's so bad that it will threaten the ongoing popularity of YouView. I chose it after careful thought because it was the best platform. This is no longer the case. You can't afford to behave like this when others are upping their game.

    Please could someone from YouView respond to all these comments and confirm when and how we can reverse this change and get back the platform which had virtually nothing wrong with it?

    I sent a direct message to their Facebook account yesterday. This was the reply I received today:

    Hi Caroline, thanks for getting in touch with us.

    The next gen software update was built from the ground up with our shareholders BT and TalkTalk to optimise the performance of the box, support our new cloud service and ensure the that all future service and features work going forward. The cloud connectivity allows us to update the box far quicker than was possible on the previous version of the software.

    The broadband line provider determines the user interface branding a box displays, just like in our old interface, where the ISP Player displayed on the main menu being determined by the connected broadband line, but we do recognize it is more prominent now.

    All connected set top boxes will have the new user interface structure bringing with it much of our original functionality as well as new functionality to come as we move through the year. However, that being said- the feedback we have received from users is hugely important to how we develop the software going forward. We have raised all of this information with our Product Managers, and those of our affiliate providers. A great deal of the feedback we have had on the UI and navigation will influence our product development for future software. We have identified a number feedback themes for areas such as MyTV for improvement as an example:

    - the ordering of content
    - the amount of content displayed
    - the ease of reading content titles and details
    - the scroll navigation

    MyTV in particular is a top priority for us and improvements and new functionality are being developed for this. We are committed to ensuring that the ease of use and quality of the interface is at the forefront or our development going forward and we are taking on board feedback in our development.

    At the moment we haven't shared any details on further development but when we do we will make sure to update on here, our forum and support site https://support.youview.com/.

    Thanks again
  • jimbjimb Member, Super User Posts: 1,412 ✭✭✭
    edited 2 April 2017, 9:07PM

    It's very disappointing that no-one from YouView is responding to all these comments. Presumably you set up this thread because you intended to read what people have to say about the software change (I don't think we should call this an "upgrade"). It really should be clear to you by now that:

    - The change has been a disaster. Customer response is overwhelmingly negative. To the extent you did any consultation/research before implementing this change then it was sadly inadequate. If a small bunch of people told you this was a "good idea" then the likelihood is they were secretly working for Sky.

    - The customers are not simply a bunch of conservative philistines resistant to any sort of change. We like change if it is an improvement, but people don't like this because it is materially worse than what went before. The comparison to Windows 8 is spot on.

    - It's so bad that it will threaten the ongoing popularity of YouView. I chose it after careful thought because it was the best platform. This is no longer the case. You can't afford to behave like this when others are upping their game.

    Please could someone from YouView respond to all these comments and confirm when and how we can reverse this change and get back the platform which had virtually nothing wrong with it?

    So whoever wrote this is not acknowledging the problems with how MyTV handles series recordings.
    From my reading of the feedback from this forum these are far and away the most significant issues.
  • redchizredchiz Member, Super User Posts: 5,433 ✭✭✭
    edited 24 March 2017, 4:32PM

    It's very disappointing that no-one from YouView is responding to all these comments. Presumably you set up this thread because you intended to read what people have to say about the software change (I don't think we should call this an "upgrade"). It really should be clear to you by now that:

    - The change has been a disaster. Customer response is overwhelmingly negative. To the extent you did any consultation/research before implementing this change then it was sadly inadequate. If a small bunch of people told you this was a "good idea" then the likelihood is they were secretly working for Sky.

    - The customers are not simply a bunch of conservative philistines resistant to any sort of change. We like change if it is an improvement, but people don't like this because it is materially worse than what went before. The comparison to Windows 8 is spot on.

    - It's so bad that it will threaten the ongoing popularity of YouView. I chose it after careful thought because it was the best platform. This is no longer the case. You can't afford to behave like this when others are upping their game.

    Please could someone from YouView respond to all these comments and confirm when and how we can reverse this change and get back the platform which had virtually nothing wrong with it?

    I think (hope) "ordering of content" covers it jimb, this is much the same as the OP from YouView's Phil to the MyTV thread.
  • jimbjimb Member, Super User Posts: 1,412 ✭✭✭
    edited 24 March 2017, 4:35PM

    It's very disappointing that no-one from YouView is responding to all these comments. Presumably you set up this thread because you intended to read what people have to say about the software change (I don't think we should call this an "upgrade"). It really should be clear to you by now that:

    - The change has been a disaster. Customer response is overwhelmingly negative. To the extent you did any consultation/research before implementing this change then it was sadly inadequate. If a small bunch of people told you this was a "good idea" then the likelihood is they were secretly working for Sky.

    - The customers are not simply a bunch of conservative philistines resistant to any sort of change. We like change if it is an improvement, but people don't like this because it is materially worse than what went before. The comparison to Windows 8 is spot on.

    - It's so bad that it will threaten the ongoing popularity of YouView. I chose it after careful thought because it was the best platform. This is no longer the case. You can't afford to behave like this when others are upping their game.

    Please could someone from YouView respond to all these comments and confirm when and how we can reverse this change and get back the platform which had virtually nothing wrong with it?

    “Accessing content in the correct order“ would cover it, but not simply "ordering of content" in my opinion.
  • SanjSanj Member Posts: 1,644 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited 24 March 2017, 4:36PM

    It's very disappointing that no-one from YouView is responding to all these comments. Presumably you set up this thread because you intended to read what people have to say about the software change (I don't think we should call this an "upgrade"). It really should be clear to you by now that:

    - The change has been a disaster. Customer response is overwhelmingly negative. To the extent you did any consultation/research before implementing this change then it was sadly inadequate. If a small bunch of people told you this was a "good idea" then the likelihood is they were secretly working for Sky.

    - The customers are not simply a bunch of conservative philistines resistant to any sort of change. We like change if it is an improvement, but people don't like this because it is materially worse than what went before. The comparison to Windows 8 is spot on.

    - It's so bad that it will threaten the ongoing popularity of YouView. I chose it after careful thought because it was the best platform. This is no longer the case. You can't afford to behave like this when others are upping their game.

    Please could someone from YouView respond to all these comments and confirm when and how we can reverse this change and get back the platform which had virtually nothing wrong with it?

    Hi Christoper, 

    Posting on here is also a good way to feedback to us. We pass all feedback to the teams here at YouView. Regarding your points:

    1. I just tested this out and see what you mean. I have a Fresh Prince of Bel-Air series in MyTV and when you hover over a series you can see for 63 episodes. Delete one episode and it says 62 episodes but when I go back to my recording list in MyTV it says 63 episodes. Looks like a bug. A quick workaround is to back out of MyTV and go back in. We'll raise this with our Test Team.

    2. Yes, I also noticed this too. This may not be a bug, this may just be how it has currently been developed. I will pass this feedback on to the Product Team.

    3. This one may also not be a bug, but will pass this on as feedback also. A quick tip to help you skip back to the start of a recording. Hold the OK button and a 3 second timer will appear. This restarts the programme from 00:00 but you still need to press pause if that's what you want. 

    If you come across any other issues, please feel free to post. I would recommend starting a new thread for any bugs as it's easy to lose track of the many different conversations taking place here.
  • redchizredchiz Member, Super User Posts: 5,433 ✭✭✭
    edited 24 March 2017, 4:38PM

    It's very disappointing that no-one from YouView is responding to all these comments. Presumably you set up this thread because you intended to read what people have to say about the software change (I don't think we should call this an "upgrade"). It really should be clear to you by now that:

    - The change has been a disaster. Customer response is overwhelmingly negative. To the extent you did any consultation/research before implementing this change then it was sadly inadequate. If a small bunch of people told you this was a "good idea" then the likelihood is they were secretly working for Sky.

    - The customers are not simply a bunch of conservative philistines resistant to any sort of change. We like change if it is an improvement, but people don't like this because it is materially worse than what went before. The comparison to Windows 8 is spot on.

    - It's so bad that it will threaten the ongoing popularity of YouView. I chose it after careful thought because it was the best platform. This is no longer the case. You can't afford to behave like this when others are upping their game.

    Please could someone from YouView respond to all these comments and confirm when and how we can reverse this change and get back the platform which had virtually nothing wrong with it?

    I'm sure they're still reading.  ;)

    EDIT: And Sanj pops in while I was typing that!
  • clprattclpratt Member Posts: 8
    edited 24 March 2017, 4:44PM

    It's very disappointing that no-one from YouView is responding to all these comments. Presumably you set up this thread because you intended to read what people have to say about the software change (I don't think we should call this an "upgrade"). It really should be clear to you by now that:

    - The change has been a disaster. Customer response is overwhelmingly negative. To the extent you did any consultation/research before implementing this change then it was sadly inadequate. If a small bunch of people told you this was a "good idea" then the likelihood is they were secretly working for Sky.

    - The customers are not simply a bunch of conservative philistines resistant to any sort of change. We like change if it is an improvement, but people don't like this because it is materially worse than what went before. The comparison to Windows 8 is spot on.

    - It's so bad that it will threaten the ongoing popularity of YouView. I chose it after careful thought because it was the best platform. This is no longer the case. You can't afford to behave like this when others are upping their game.

    Please could someone from YouView respond to all these comments and confirm when and how we can reverse this change and get back the platform which had virtually nothing wrong with it?

    In addition to my earlier bug report I have just discovered 2 more problems with skip on my DTR T1000.
    1: When watching a recording, skip forward or skip back operates once when button is pushed then a second time as button is released.
    2: When watching a live programme on pause, skip back skips twice as above (pause remains paused), but skip forward skips twice but then releases the pause, so I have to reselect pause.
  • jimbjimb Member, Super User Posts: 1,412 ✭✭✭
    edited 24 March 2017, 4:58PM

    It's very disappointing that no-one from YouView is responding to all these comments. Presumably you set up this thread because you intended to read what people have to say about the software change (I don't think we should call this an "upgrade"). It really should be clear to you by now that:

    - The change has been a disaster. Customer response is overwhelmingly negative. To the extent you did any consultation/research before implementing this change then it was sadly inadequate. If a small bunch of people told you this was a "good idea" then the likelihood is they were secretly working for Sky.

    - The customers are not simply a bunch of conservative philistines resistant to any sort of change. We like change if it is an improvement, but people don't like this because it is materially worse than what went before. The comparison to Windows 8 is spot on.

    - It's so bad that it will threaten the ongoing popularity of YouView. I chose it after careful thought because it was the best platform. This is no longer the case. You can't afford to behave like this when others are upping their game.

    Please could someone from YouView respond to all these comments and confirm when and how we can reverse this change and get back the platform which had virtually nothing wrong with it?

    I've just been checking out point 2 by watching the time display on the BBC News channel. I can't reproduce any of what Christopher has described.
  • jimbjimb Member, Super User Posts: 1,412 ✭✭✭
    edited 24 March 2017, 5:29PM

    It's very disappointing that no-one from YouView is responding to all these comments. Presumably you set up this thread because you intended to read what people have to say about the software change (I don't think we should call this an "upgrade"). It really should be clear to you by now that:

    - The change has been a disaster. Customer response is overwhelmingly negative. To the extent you did any consultation/research before implementing this change then it was sadly inadequate. If a small bunch of people told you this was a "good idea" then the likelihood is they were secretly working for Sky.

    - The customers are not simply a bunch of conservative philistines resistant to any sort of change. We like change if it is an improvement, but people don't like this because it is materially worse than what went before. The comparison to Windows 8 is spot on.

    - It's so bad that it will threaten the ongoing popularity of YouView. I chose it after careful thought because it was the best platform. This is no longer the case. You can't afford to behave like this when others are upping their game.

    Please could someone from YouView respond to all these comments and confirm when and how we can reverse this change and get back the platform which had virtually nothing wrong with it?

    Could this be a faulty remote control?
  • redchizredchiz Member, Super User Posts: 5,433 ✭✭✭
    edited 24 March 2017, 5:29PM

    It's very disappointing that no-one from YouView is responding to all these comments. Presumably you set up this thread because you intended to read what people have to say about the software change (I don't think we should call this an "upgrade"). It really should be clear to you by now that:

    - The change has been a disaster. Customer response is overwhelmingly negative. To the extent you did any consultation/research before implementing this change then it was sadly inadequate. If a small bunch of people told you this was a "good idea" then the likelihood is they were secretly working for Sky.

    - The customers are not simply a bunch of conservative philistines resistant to any sort of change. We like change if it is an improvement, but people don't like this because it is materially worse than what went before. The comparison to Windows 8 is spot on.

    - It's so bad that it will threaten the ongoing popularity of YouView. I chose it after careful thought because it was the best platform. This is no longer the case. You can't afford to behave like this when others are upping their game.

    Please could someone from YouView respond to all these comments and confirm when and how we can reverse this change and get back the platform which had virtually nothing wrong with it?

    Good shout jimb. If you have children. Or eat jam.
  • Chris A.Chris A. Member Posts: 76
    edited 24 March 2017, 7:45PM
    Sanj said:

    Hi northern -  You mentioned your box wasn't working. Can you tell me more about what you're experiencing?

    Hmm, so, if you get a bad update you could still roll it back using factory reset as above, then disconnect from the internet permanently. Meaning that whilst you wont have any catchup TV, youwill still have your 'original' youview box setup.
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