BT YouView Box Connections

comengtractcomengtract Posts: 3Member
On the current version of the BT YouView Box there are 2* USB 2.0 sockets, one located on the rear of the box underneath the Ethernet connector and the second USB connection is located on the side of the enclosure.
Also, on the rear of the Box, there is an optical SPDIF socket located next to the RCA connectors.
What is the purpose of these connections and to what purposes can they be employed?
Can one transfer recordings to a USB drive, How can this be done?
Play recordings on a USB Drive the the youView Box on the TV etc?

Comments

  • VisionmanVisionman Posts: 9,334Member ✭✭✭
    edited 2 April 2019, 9:05PM
    Hi @comengtract The USB sockets can only be used in two ways - one as a USB charger and the other for software engineer fixes. The SPDIF was for surround sound to an external surround sound unit, but thats carried via HDMI now if your HDMI is capable of carrying surround sound.
  • RoyRoy Posts: 15,052Member ✭✭✭
    edited 2 April 2019, 10:37PM
    Visionman said:
    Hi @comengtract The USB sockets can only be used in two ways - one as a USB charger and the other for software engineer fixes. The SPDIF was for surround sound to an external surround sound unit, but thats carried via HDMI now if your HDMI is capable of carrying surround sound.
    Hi @comengtract

    @Visionman’s first sentence is spot on, but may I clarify that last sentence?

    The YouView box can be configured to output stereo sound or surround sound. Surround sound is from the digital outputs only. Read ‘stereo’ instead of ‘surround’ below if you have not configured the YouView box for surround sound.

    The RCAs output stereo sound for use with analogue line level inputs on an external audio device.

    The S/PDIF outputs surround sound for use with a corresponding digital input on an external audio device.

    The HDMI outputs vídeo and surround sound for use with devices that can handle both - usually a TV, but sometimes an AV receiver or soundbar that will handle the audio itself, but pass on the video to a TV or monitor.

    Where possible, HDMI is to be preferred, but where it is not possible to get optimum audio and video together (e.g. when the TV can’t do justice to the surround sound, and the audio device can’t handle the video) there is a case for using the HDMI for video to the TV, and the S/PDIF for audio to a device that can exploit the surround sound.

    If you tell us exactly what video and audio equipment you have at your disposal, we can likely suggest the optimum configuration.
    Does HDMI stand for Hardly Dare Mention It?
  • StephenStephen Posts: 667Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    The USB sockets are also for attaching a keyboard as well as manual software updates (and charging!) mentioned above, but indeed not for export or import of recordings.
  • KeithKeith Posts: 2,428Member, Champion mod
    Another niche use for the USB socket is to power a nano wifi bridge (e.g. the TP-Link devices people used to suggest) should you need to work around the lack of wifi support on YouView boxes (and not need multicast over wifi which can be more complicated) :)
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