Freeview service to rival Youview announced

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  • scottscott Member, Super User Posts: 2,134 ✭✭✭
    edited 29 November 2016, 10:48AM
    gwatuk said:

    A bit more analysis from Steve Hewlett:
    http://www.theguardian.com/media/medi...

    This is the first time I've seen this stated explicitly:
    "...eventually launched in 2012. But by then the Flash technology at its heart was out of date..."

    Funny how they blast ITV and CH4 for not letting HD content on freeview but don't mention the one PSB who doesn't even have thier MAIN channel on freeview in HD...
  • c cc c Member Posts: 413
    edited 9 July 2014, 11:05PM
    gwatuk said:

    A bit more analysis from Steve Hewlett:
    http://www.theguardian.com/media/medi...

    This is the first time I've seen this stated explicitly:
    "...eventually launched in 2012. But by then the Flash technology at its heart was out of date..."

    That little difficulty is probably going to vanish once Viacom take control - assuming the HD channels do get awarded PSB status and EPG prominence by the DCMS.
  • scottscott Member, Super User Posts: 2,134 ✭✭✭
    edited 29 November 2016, 10:48AM
    gwatuk said:

    A bit more analysis from Steve Hewlett:
    http://www.theguardian.com/media/medi...

    This is the first time I've seen this stated explicitly:
    "...eventually launched in 2012. But by then the Flash technology at its heart was out of date..."

    Does that mean Ch5 will no longer be getting the backhanders from sky....
  • c cc c Member Posts: 413
    edited 9 July 2014, 11:05PM
    gwatuk said:

    A bit more analysis from Steve Hewlett:
    http://www.theguardian.com/media/medi...

    This is the first time I've seen this stated explicitly:
    "...eventually launched in 2012. But by then the Flash technology at its heart was out of date..."

    PSB status would presumably require a commitment to FTA transmission. No reason that I can see for Viacom to have any objection to that. On the contrary, that's exactly what they want.
  • scottscott Member, Super User Posts: 2,134 ✭✭✭
    edited 29 November 2016, 10:48AM
    gwatuk said:

    A bit more analysis from Steve Hewlett:
    http://www.theguardian.com/media/medi...

    This is the first time I've seen this stated explicitly:
    "...eventually launched in 2012. But by then the Flash technology at its heart was out of date..."

    Yes but Ch5 already had PSB status and they still took money to not transmit thier channel in HD FTA, so why would that change.
  • c cc c Member Posts: 413
    edited 9 July 2014, 11:05PM
    gwatuk said:

    A bit more analysis from Steve Hewlett:
    http://www.theguardian.com/media/medi...

    This is the first time I've seen this stated explicitly:
    "...eventually launched in 2012. But by then the Flash technology at its heart was out of date..."

    Ch5 has PSB status. Ch5HD does not. Same for all the HD simulcasts, hence their current non-prominent EPG positions. The DCMS is currently considering this, among other things.
  • scottscott Member, Super User Posts: 2,134 ✭✭✭
    edited 29 November 2016, 10:48AM
    gwatuk said:

    A bit more analysis from Steve Hewlett:
    http://www.theguardian.com/media/medi...

    This is the first time I've seen this stated explicitly:
    "...eventually launched in 2012. But by then the Flash technology at its heart was out of date..."

    OK that makes sense. what are the chances of it making HD PSB reliant and how quickly would it come into force.....
  • c cc c Member Posts: 413
    edited 9 July 2014, 11:05PM
    gwatuk said:

    A bit more analysis from Steve Hewlett:
    http://www.theguardian.com/media/medi...

    This is the first time I've seen this stated explicitly:
    "...eventually launched in 2012. But by then the Flash technology at its heart was out of date..."

    Not sure what you mean by "making HD PSB reliant"

    The whole question is mired in complexity as local TV also is battling for prominence. And many viewers don't yet even have HD, so wouldn't take kindly to changes.
  • c cc c Member Posts: 413
    edited 9 July 2014, 11:05PM
    gwatuk said:

    A bit more analysis from Steve Hewlett:
    http://www.theguardian.com/media/medi...

    This is the first time I've seen this stated explicitly:
    "...eventually launched in 2012. But by then the Flash technology at its heart was out of date..."

    From the DCMS Impact Assessment (https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads...):
    Summary of preferred option with implementation plan
    Ensure PSB Prominence by redefining an EPG service
    The Government is proposing to consult on redefining an EPG service so that it is brought up to date with recent developments in TV technology and to give it the flexibility to adapt to future technological developments. We believe that this will likely involve a number of changes to the current EPG regulatory regime set out in the Communications Act 2003 including:
    i. Redefining an EPG in primary legislation
    ii. Introducing an Authorisation regime to replace the EPG licensing regime in line with European regulations
    iii. Including on-Demand and HD services in the list of Public Service Channels
    DCMS will consult on its proposals in relation to EPG with all relevant stakeholders including the PSBs, commercial broadcasters, platform operators, and potential platform operators to make certain that both costs and burdens are minimised and that the proposals properly take into account future technological change and the impact on all parts of the broadcast value chain. Ofcom will also consult with the industry on the implementation of these changes as and when the power is enacted.
    Question: will item (iii) mean that all four PSB OD services will have to put in an appearance on all connected PVRs, TVs, *casts, sticks and streamers?
  • Lbear1Lbear1 Member Posts: 741
    edited 9 June 2014, 12:12PM
    gwatuk said:

    A bit more analysis from Steve Hewlett:
    http://www.theguardian.com/media/medi...

    This is the first time I've seen this stated explicitly:
    "...eventually launched in 2012. But by then the Flash technology at its heart was out of date..."

    The DTT  HD general entertainment channels have their own sequence and de facto prominence in the EPG to reflect their positions on LCN 1-4.  Five could have had 105 but declined three times to start transmitting 5HD so lost the prominent spot on LCN105.

    On the subject of 5HD, there seems to be nothing to stop Viacom starting a DTT HD channel with another name - say Five Viacom - as a way of avoiding contractural obligations to Sky for 5HD. There is a precedent for this in Sky Atlantic which was introduced to carry all the popular American series on an exclusive Sky subscribers' channel. Viacom could use it as leverage to void the contract between Dirty Desmond and the Murdochs.

    I'd also by the way be in favour of an OfCom/HMRC investigation into the transfer prices negotiated by Sky with Fox studios and Five with Viacom to ensure that taxes are being properly paid.

  • c cc c Member Posts: 413
    edited 9 July 2014, 11:05PM
    gwatuk said:

    A bit more analysis from Steve Hewlett:
    http://www.theguardian.com/media/medi...

    This is the first time I've seen this stated explicitly:
    "...eventually launched in 2012. But by then the Flash technology at its heart was out of date..."

    Sky is unlikely to let FiveHD agreements get in the way of its potential new Adserve deal with Viacom.
  • alal Member, Super User Posts: 1,341 ✭✭✭
    edited 8 December 2016, 11:01AM
    gwatuk said:

    A bit more analysis from Steve Hewlett:
    http://www.theguardian.com/media/medi...

    This is the first time I've seen this stated explicitly:
    "...eventually launched in 2012. But by then the Flash technology at its heart was out of date..."

    I guess it wont be long before 5HD can get LCN105 back. (If they wanted it)
  • edited 6 March 2017, 9:48PM
    I find it interesting how many of the reports about the "Freeview Connect" announcement regard it as a simple confirmation and acknowledgement that YouView has become just a BT/TalkTalk enterprise.


    "YouView is now effectively a BT and TalkTalk proposition. Last month’s relaunch saw a commitment to increase staff levels and target new platforms with a reported £100 million investment. Its founder shareholders are thought to be investing the minimum required to retain their 14.3 per cent equal stakes (£1m a year each, say some reports), whilst BT and TalkTalk will significantly add to this. In other words, the broadcasters are doing the absolute minimum to support YouView, without breaching their shareholder agreements."


    http://www.telecomtv.com/articles/vid...
  • scottscott Member, Super User Posts: 2,134 ✭✭✭
    edited 29 November 2016, 10:48AM
    gwatuk said:

    I find it interesting how many of the reports about the "Freeview Connect" announcement regard it as a simple confirmation and acknowledgement that YouView has become just a BT/TalkTalk enterprise.


    "YouView is now effectively a BT and TalkTalk proposition. Last month’s relaunch saw a commitment to increase staff levels and target new platforms with a reported £100 million investment. Its founder shareholders are thought to be investing the minimum required to retain their 14.3 per cent equal stakes (£1m a year each, say some reports), whilst BT and TalkTalk will significantly add to this. In other words, the broadcasters are doing the absolute minimum to support YouView, without breaching their shareholder agreements."


    http://www.telecomtv.com/articles/vid...

    That is going to be how it is looked as it has the same players as YouView except without the isp's.
    To me it is designed as a way to get a unified EPG built into TV's. I think the PVR market is a lot less straightforward and IF YouView could get people like Netflix/Amazon on board that could still encourage people to go the YouView route without the extra's offered by the PAY ISP's....
    But I do feel the ISP's are the ones that are going to add the extra's that will bring people to YouView in the main and could still make YouView a massive player.
    But with BSKYB still involved in freeview connect it could well be some time before it emerges, my question would be what specs and so forth stops them slightly adapting freetime across to freeview.
  • c cc c Member Posts: 413
    edited 9 July 2014, 11:05PM
    gwatuk said:

    I find it interesting how many of the reports about the "Freeview Connect" announcement regard it as a simple confirmation and acknowledgement that YouView has become just a BT/TalkTalk enterprise.


    "YouView is now effectively a BT and TalkTalk proposition. Last month’s relaunch saw a commitment to increase staff levels and target new platforms with a reported £100 million investment. Its founder shareholders are thought to be investing the minimum required to retain their 14.3 per cent equal stakes (£1m a year each, say some reports), whilst BT and TalkTalk will significantly add to this. In other words, the broadcasters are doing the absolute minimum to support YouView, without breaching their shareholder agreements."


    http://www.telecomtv.com/articles/vid...

    But with BSKYB still involved in freeview connect it could well be some time before it emerges
    How do you mean? Sky is one of the five Freeview shareholders but it doesn't by any means have a controlling share. It's not a shareholder in Digital UK.
  • scottscott Member, Super User Posts: 2,134 ✭✭✭
    edited 29 November 2016, 10:48AM
    gwatuk said:

    I find it interesting how many of the reports about the "Freeview Connect" announcement regard it as a simple confirmation and acknowledgement that YouView has become just a BT/TalkTalk enterprise.


    "YouView is now effectively a BT and TalkTalk proposition. Last month’s relaunch saw a commitment to increase staff levels and target new platforms with a reported £100 million investment. Its founder shareholders are thought to be investing the minimum required to retain their 14.3 per cent equal stakes (£1m a year each, say some reports), whilst BT and TalkTalk will significantly add to this. In other words, the broadcasters are doing the absolute minimum to support YouView, without breaching their shareholder agreements."


    http://www.telecomtv.com/articles/vid...

    Yes but do you really think sky will be a silent partner in this...i am sure they will want to get something out of it...
  • c cc c Member Posts: 413
    edited 9 July 2014, 11:05PM
    gwatuk said:

    I find it interesting how many of the reports about the "Freeview Connect" announcement regard it as a simple confirmation and acknowledgement that YouView has become just a BT/TalkTalk enterprise.


    "YouView is now effectively a BT and TalkTalk proposition. Last month’s relaunch saw a commitment to increase staff levels and target new platforms with a reported £100 million investment. Its founder shareholders are thought to be investing the minimum required to retain their 14.3 per cent equal stakes (£1m a year each, say some reports), whilst BT and TalkTalk will significantly add to this. In other words, the broadcasters are doing the absolute minimum to support YouView, without breaching their shareholder agreements."


    http://www.telecomtv.com/articles/vid...

    I can't see what. Any suggestions?
  • scottscott Member, Super User Posts: 2,134 ✭✭✭
    edited 29 November 2016, 10:48AM
    gwatuk said:

    I find it interesting how many of the reports about the "Freeview Connect" announcement regard it as a simple confirmation and acknowledgement that YouView has become just a BT/TalkTalk enterprise.


    "YouView is now effectively a BT and TalkTalk proposition. Last month’s relaunch saw a commitment to increase staff levels and target new platforms with a reported £100 million investment. Its founder shareholders are thought to be investing the minimum required to retain their 14.3 per cent equal stakes (£1m a year each, say some reports), whilst BT and TalkTalk will significantly add to this. In other words, the broadcasters are doing the absolute minimum to support YouView, without breaching their shareholder agreements."


    http://www.telecomtv.com/articles/vid...

    Well there seems to be some strange reporting on this. £100 miliion is mentioned by the 5 shareholders, now some report this to be BBC,ITV,CH4,Arquiva and BskyB and some mention BBC,ITV,Ch4,Arquiva and Ch5. So who is actually putting in the money...If it is BskyB as a partner in Freeview why would you think they wouldn't want something out of it.

    As for what well I am sure they will think of some money making scheme...

    also if they use HbbTV I think they could all be hijacked by sky sending subliminal messages to everyone anyway :)

    http://advanced-television.com/2014/06/09/smart-tvs-risk-hbbtv-hack/
  • c cc c Member Posts: 413
    edited 9 July 2014, 11:05PM
    gwatuk said:

    I find it interesting how many of the reports about the "Freeview Connect" announcement regard it as a simple confirmation and acknowledgement that YouView has become just a BT/TalkTalk enterprise.


    "YouView is now effectively a BT and TalkTalk proposition. Last month’s relaunch saw a commitment to increase staff levels and target new platforms with a reported £100 million investment. Its founder shareholders are thought to be investing the minimum required to retain their 14.3 per cent equal stakes (£1m a year each, say some reports), whilst BT and TalkTalk will significantly add to this. In other words, the broadcasters are doing the absolute minimum to support YouView, without breaching their shareholder agreements."


    http://www.telecomtv.com/articles/vid...

    We'll have to wait and see, but to me it looks like Sky probably doesn't mind seeing the PBS broadcasters divert funds from YouView to FreeView. It's BT that's their competition, not Freeview Connect.
  • c cc c Member Posts: 413
    edited 9 July 2014, 11:05PM
    gwatuk said:

    I find it interesting how many of the reports about the "Freeview Connect" announcement regard it as a simple confirmation and acknowledgement that YouView has become just a BT/TalkTalk enterprise.


    "YouView is now effectively a BT and TalkTalk proposition. Last month’s relaunch saw a commitment to increase staff levels and target new platforms with a reported £100 million investment. Its founder shareholders are thought to be investing the minimum required to retain their 14.3 per cent equal stakes (£1m a year each, say some reports), whilst BT and TalkTalk will significantly add to this. In other words, the broadcasters are doing the absolute minimum to support YouView, without breaching their shareholder agreements."


    http://www.telecomtv.com/articles/vid...

    also if they use HbbTV I think they could all be hijacked by sky sending subliminal messages to everyone anyway :)
    :-)
  • c cc c Member Posts: 413
    edited 9 July 2014, 11:05PM
    gwatuk said:

    I find it interesting how many of the reports about the "Freeview Connect" announcement regard it as a simple confirmation and acknowledgement that YouView has become just a BT/TalkTalk enterprise.


    "YouView is now effectively a BT and TalkTalk proposition. Last month’s relaunch saw a commitment to increase staff levels and target new platforms with a reported £100 million investment. Its founder shareholders are thought to be investing the minimum required to retain their 14.3 per cent equal stakes (£1m a year each, say some reports), whilst BT and TalkTalk will significantly add to this. In other words, the broadcasters are doing the absolute minimum to support YouView, without breaching their shareholder agreements."


    http://www.telecomtv.com/articles/vid...

    Well there seems to be some strange reporting on this. £100 miliion is mentioned by the 5 shareholders, now some report this to be BBC,ITV,CH4,Arquiva and BskyB and some mention BBC,ITV,Ch4,Arquiva and Ch5. So who is actually putting in the money...
    After some googling I've concluded the Guardian's inclusion of Five is just a mistake. I haven't seen anyone else mention it, and Five's not a shareholder in either company.
  • TomWTomW Member Posts: 508 ✭✭
    edited 27 November 2016, 6:35PM

    I agree with c c, this is now getting really messy. Three systems, YouView, Freetime and Freeview Connect all offering effectively the same thing, or very similar, and all with very similar names.

    On the plus side YouView have clearly lost what has up until now been their primary USP so hopefully we will start to see some real innovation from YouView in the not too distant future.


  • RoyRoy Member, Super User Posts: 17,658 ✭✭✭
    edited 7 December 2016, 7:39AM
    gwatuk said:

    I find it interesting how many of the reports about the "Freeview Connect" announcement regard it as a simple confirmation and acknowledgement that YouView has become just a BT/TalkTalk enterprise.


    "YouView is now effectively a BT and TalkTalk proposition. Last month’s relaunch saw a commitment to increase staff levels and target new platforms with a reported £100 million investment. Its founder shareholders are thought to be investing the minimum required to retain their 14.3 per cent equal stakes (£1m a year each, say some reports), whilst BT and TalkTalk will significantly add to this. In other words, the broadcasters are doing the absolute minimum to support YouView, without breaching their shareholder agreements."


    http://www.telecomtv.com/articles/vid...

    It may well be Sky in the pie, but until something concrete emerges we can actually use, FreeView Connect is just pie in the sky.....
    ‘Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful’ Wm Morris
  • edited 6 March 2017, 9:48PM
    "Broadcast" has spoken:
    Freeview offers catch-up in challenge to YouView
    (By Alex Farber)

    Freeview’s planned internet-connected TV service is bidding to take advantage of the growing perception that YouView is a broadband-bundled service.
    Freeview and Digital UK last week revealed that a fi ve-year plan had been signed off by Freeview’s shareholders (the BBC, ITV, Sky, Channel 4 and Arqiva) to develop a service, dubbed Freeview Connect, that will offer viewers access to linear channels and on-demand content.

    The shareholders’ catch-up services – including iPlayer, ITV Player and 4oD – are likely to be the first to be made available, with Freeview keen to encourage other free-to-air broadcasters to join the new platform.

    Ilse Howling, previously Freeview managing director, has been appointed to the new role of managing director of connected TV for Digital UK to ensure the service is adopted by TV and set-top box manufacturers.

    Howling said that because rival connected-TV service YouView is mainly being distributed as part of a package of premium services by BT and TalkTalk, an opportunity has opened up for Freeview to exploit.

    “YouView has done a tremendous job in breaking new ground and has been a pioneer in its achievements,” Howling said. “But in consumer terms, it is associated with being bundled with BT and TalkTalk. What we are looking to do is different and the critical piece is it will be available in retail.”

    While YouView is also available as a direct-toconsumer proposition, the bulk of its 1 million sales are made via its ISP stakeholders.

    Freeview has previously supported VoD content via its Freeview HD platform but the specific services offered have been selected by individual television manufacturers, with no consistency guaranteed.

    “There is a fragmented offer across different manufacturers and for consumers it is quite confusing to have an array of different services,” Howling said. “No one has yet created a simple compelling consumer proposition with a consistent core offer and the umbrella brand that says ‘this is free to consume and high quality’.”

    Howling added she was confident that consumer aware - ness of Free view would translate into adoption of iPlayer: BBC service is likely to be one of the first on Freeview Connect

    Freeview offers catch-up in challenge to YouView the service. “The value of the Freeview brand is a great advantage because people have already bought into it.”

    No launch date has been set for Freeview Connect, which has been reported to have secured a £100m investment from its shareholders. “The key for us is to keep pace with the expectations of the Freeview audience and aim to meet their needs and give them something of value,” said Howling. “If you love subscription-free TV, the natural step is to integrate live TV with catch-up.”

    She added that a Digital UK study of 8,000 people found that more than 50% said access to catchup services would make them more likely to stay with Freeview.

    Separately, subscription-free satellite TV service Freesat has bolstered its 200-strong channel offering this week with the launch of Forces TV.

    The service, dedicated to the armed forces, is being led by Services Sound and Vision Corporation chief executive and former head of Sky News Nick Pollard.
  • c cc c Member Posts: 413
    edited 9 July 2014, 11:05PM
    gwatuk said:

    "Broadcast" has spoken:

    Freeview offers catch-up in challenge to YouView
    (By Alex Farber)

    Freeview’s planned internet-connected TV service is bidding to take advantage of the growing perception that YouView is a broadband-bundled service.
    Freeview and Digital UK last week revealed that a fi ve-year plan had been signed off by Freeview’s shareholders (the BBC, ITV, Sky, Channel 4 and Arqiva) to develop a service, dubbed Freeview Connect, that will offer viewers access to linear channels and on-demand content.

    The shareholders’ catch-up services – including iPlayer, ITV Player and 4oD – are likely to be the first to be made available, with Freeview keen to encourage other free-to-air broadcasters to join the new platform.

    Ilse Howling, previously Freeview managing director, has been appointed to the new role of managing director of connected TV for Digital UK to ensure the service is adopted by TV and set-top box manufacturers.

    Howling said that because rival connected-TV service YouView is mainly being distributed as part of a package of premium services by BT and TalkTalk, an opportunity has opened up for Freeview to exploit.

    “YouView has done a tremendous job in breaking new ground and has been a pioneer in its achievements,” Howling said. “But in consumer terms, it is associated with being bundled with BT and TalkTalk. What we are looking to do is different and the critical piece is it will be available in retail.”

    While YouView is also available as a direct-toconsumer proposition, the bulk of its 1 million sales are made via its ISP stakeholders.

    Freeview has previously supported VoD content via its Freeview HD platform but the specific services offered have been selected by individual television manufacturers, with no consistency guaranteed.

    “There is a fragmented offer across different manufacturers and for consumers it is quite confusing to have an array of different services,” Howling said. “No one has yet created a simple compelling consumer proposition with a consistent core offer and the umbrella brand that says ‘this is free to consume and high quality’.”

    Howling added she was confident that consumer aware - ness of Free view would translate into adoption of iPlayer: BBC service is likely to be one of the first on Freeview Connect

    Freeview offers catch-up in challenge to YouView the service. “The value of the Freeview brand is a great advantage because people have already bought into it.”

    No launch date has been set for Freeview Connect, which has been reported to have secured a £100m investment from its shareholders. “The key for us is to keep pace with the expectations of the Freeview audience and aim to meet their needs and give them something of value,” said Howling. “If you love subscription-free TV, the natural step is to integrate live TV with catch-up.”

    She added that a Digital UK study of 8,000 people found that more than 50% said access to catchup services would make them more likely to stay with Freeview.

    Separately, subscription-free satellite TV service Freesat has bolstered its 200-strong channel offering this week with the launch of Forces TV.

    The service, dedicated to the armed forces, is being led by Services Sound and Vision Corporation chief executive and former head of Sky News Nick Pollard.
    So has expertreviews:
    BT and TalkTalk hijacked YouView, so what’s the point in Freeview Connect?

    Posted on 11 Jun 2014 at 15:25, by James Temperton

    YouView was meant to be a way for people to get free catch-up TV, but BT and TalkTalk have ensured it has become a colossal and costly failure.

    The BBC Trust has called into question the wisdom of the BBC spending millions of pounds creating a supposedly ‘free’ platform, only to see it overrun by companies flogging it on expensive contracts.

    YouView had admirable aims - it was created to take on Sky and Virgin Media’s stranglehold on the pay TV market by offering a similar servicewith no monthly fee. After all, why should you have to pay for BBC iPlayer, ITV Player, 4oD and Demand 5?

    In a shambolic turn of events BT and TalkTalk have been allowed to hijack the service for their own commercial gains, leaving the major broadcasters who had invested millions to get it up and running looking thoroughly stupid.

    Priced at between £150 and £250, sales of YouView boxes have been poor. Of the 1 million YouView set-top boxes sold in the UK, just 30,000 were bought on the high street with the rest being flogged by BT and TalkTalk as part of their broadband and pay-TV services.

    Along with other investors the BBC, ITV and Channel 4 have pumped tens of millions of pounds into YouView, only to bullied out of the project by BT and TalkTalk.

    In February of this year the BBC Trust released a damning review of the service and the BBC's involvement in it:

    "In practice, nearly all YouView 'sales' have been of subsidised equipment offered by sponsoring internet service providers in exchange for a subscription payment of some kind," the Trust said.

    It added that the failure of YouView should force the BBC to rethink its strategy of making catch-up TV freely available to the masses.

    The major broadcasters remain equity shareholders in YouView, with BT and TalkTalk happy to pump money into the project in a bid to take on Sky's massive pay-TV market share.

    Enter Freeview Connect. Announced earlier this month, the new partnership between the BBC, ITV, Channel 4, Five and transmission company Arqiva hopes to make free TV and catch-up services available to the masses, without costly monthly subscriptions. Sound familiar?

    The new Freeview service will see £100 million of investment over the next five years as the broadcasters aim to take on YouView, a service they have already shovelled millions into creating. As yet there's no word of when Freeview Connect will be available.

    Ultimately, all this incompetence and waste is bad news for normal people who want to watch TV without paying a fortune for the privilege. Apparently that is too much to ask.

    YouView has been a shambles ever since Lord Sugar, who was paid £500,000 for a year as chairman of the company, unveiled the new service at a glitzy launch party in 2012 - two years late.

    Freeview Connect needs to deliver on its promise of free, high-quality catch-up TV. If it fails like YouView then millions of people are going to be left paying over the odds to watch the shows they love.
  • RoyRoy Member, Super User Posts: 17,658 ✭✭✭
    edited 7 December 2016, 7:39AM
    gwatuk said:

    "Broadcast" has spoken:

    Freeview offers catch-up in challenge to YouView
    (By Alex Farber)

    Freeview’s planned internet-connected TV service is bidding to take advantage of the growing perception that YouView is a broadband-bundled service.
    Freeview and Digital UK last week revealed that a fi ve-year plan had been signed off by Freeview’s shareholders (the BBC, ITV, Sky, Channel 4 and Arqiva) to develop a service, dubbed Freeview Connect, that will offer viewers access to linear channels and on-demand content.

    The shareholders’ catch-up services – including iPlayer, ITV Player and 4oD – are likely to be the first to be made available, with Freeview keen to encourage other free-to-air broadcasters to join the new platform.

    Ilse Howling, previously Freeview managing director, has been appointed to the new role of managing director of connected TV for Digital UK to ensure the service is adopted by TV and set-top box manufacturers.

    Howling said that because rival connected-TV service YouView is mainly being distributed as part of a package of premium services by BT and TalkTalk, an opportunity has opened up for Freeview to exploit.

    “YouView has done a tremendous job in breaking new ground and has been a pioneer in its achievements,” Howling said. “But in consumer terms, it is associated with being bundled with BT and TalkTalk. What we are looking to do is different and the critical piece is it will be available in retail.”

    While YouView is also available as a direct-toconsumer proposition, the bulk of its 1 million sales are made via its ISP stakeholders.

    Freeview has previously supported VoD content via its Freeview HD platform but the specific services offered have been selected by individual television manufacturers, with no consistency guaranteed.

    “There is a fragmented offer across different manufacturers and for consumers it is quite confusing to have an array of different services,” Howling said. “No one has yet created a simple compelling consumer proposition with a consistent core offer and the umbrella brand that says ‘this is free to consume and high quality’.”

    Howling added she was confident that consumer aware - ness of Free view would translate into adoption of iPlayer: BBC service is likely to be one of the first on Freeview Connect

    Freeview offers catch-up in challenge to YouView the service. “The value of the Freeview brand is a great advantage because people have already bought into it.”

    No launch date has been set for Freeview Connect, which has been reported to have secured a £100m investment from its shareholders. “The key for us is to keep pace with the expectations of the Freeview audience and aim to meet their needs and give them something of value,” said Howling. “If you love subscription-free TV, the natural step is to integrate live TV with catch-up.”

    She added that a Digital UK study of 8,000 people found that more than 50% said access to catchup services would make them more likely to stay with Freeview.

    Separately, subscription-free satellite TV service Freesat has bolstered its 200-strong channel offering this week with the launch of Forces TV.

    The service, dedicated to the armed forces, is being led by Services Sound and Vision Corporation chief executive and former head of Sky News Nick Pollard.
    I think he's been reading my posts here :-)

    If not, then great minds.... :-)

    I park my valise.....
    ‘Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful’ Wm Morris
  • edited 6 March 2017, 9:48PM
    YouView’s long-term strategy will not change in the face of new competition from Freeview’s new connected TV plan with the platform to continue to benefit from its ISP support, according to CEO Richard Halton.
    YouView still on course despite Freeview challenge, says Halton
  • stormystormy Member Posts: 1,026 ✭✭
    edited 1 December 2016, 8:24AM
    gwatuk said:

    YouView’s long-term strategy will not change in the face of new competition from Freeview’s new connected TV plan with the platform to continue to benefit from its ISP support, according to CEO Richard Halton.
    YouView still on course despite Freeview challenge, says Halton
    He can't really say much else to be honest.
  • RoyRoy Member, Super User Posts: 17,658 ✭✭✭
    edited 7 December 2016, 7:39AM
    gwatuk said:

    YouView’s long-term strategy will not change in the face of new competition from Freeview’s new connected TV plan with the platform to continue to benefit from its ISP support, according to CEO Richard Halton.
    YouView still on course despite Freeview challenge, says Halton
    He could have said a lot different from what he did say though. The course, he reveals, is nakedly a tussle between the rival TV broadband providers, BT, TT, Sky and Virgin.

    Never mind that only two of those originate programming (and BT only originate sports) and that all four depend very heavily on the output of the PBS broadcasters, without whom the ISPs' offerings would have no credibility.

    Never mind that even if DTT/satellite lessens in importance and broadband delivery comes more to the fore that it will still be principally the programming originators who will need to be considered.

    But it seems it isn't what's going to be going down the pipes that matters, or where it comes from; it's going to be all about the people who own the pipes, apparently

    That's ****-backwards, and it may well indicate how thoroughly YouView has been subsumed into an ISP-centric way of looking at things rather than a broadcaster-centric one.

    If Richard Halton has been quoted accurately, and in context, then things are already worse than I feared.
    ‘Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful’ Wm Morris
  • VisionmanVisionman Member, Super User Posts: 10,300 ✭✭✭
    edited 6 March 2017, 9:48PM
    Hi all. Couldn't resist, sorry.  :)

    I just wanted to provide some balance to what has been said already, if thats OK. Lets go back to gwatuks excellent link -

    http://www.digitaltveurope.net/191392/youview-still-on-course-despite-freeview-challenge-says-halton...

    “BT has already committed to start swapping their existing BT TV boxes out and putting YouView in. TalkTalk and BT, you have to remember, are 50% of the broadband homes in the UK. They are 75-80% of homes with Freeview DTT,” said Halton.

    So its only natural for YouView, in its development, to initially gravitate around these two. Its a numbers game.

    If you look at YouView stats in retail, we ship pretty much 25-30% of all Freeview DTT PVRs in this country. That’s our marketshare, so it’s pretty significant."

    Its very significant. Freetime has 40% of the Freesat PVR market and the reason for the disparity is that they have the full backing and advertising power of Freesat behind them. So saying YouView doesn't have either the backing or advertising power of Freeview behind them, a top line figure of 30% PVR market share is impressive.

    And to back this up further -

    http://www.hottopicstech.com/2014/06/12/youview-manage-seven-shareholder/

    “In the first instance it will be the Internet Service Providers (ISPs) who will spearhead the additional investment. The extent to which they continue to do this will be a function of how quickly we can grow our revenues, add more features and grow as a business.” he explained.

    But the broadcasters and additional retail services won't be forgotten, or abandoned either -

    Having seven shareholders, including a number of direct competitors, is a big challenge, said Halton, although he adds that it is their key strength too. “For YouView to be successful you need a great product and you need great TV content. The people who understand television are the people who make it. Broadcasters understand not just how to make programmes but also how to make them discoverable, how to find them, how to put great context around them and add a lot of value to them,” he said.

    But to put a downer on my positive comments comments above - the new Red Buttons late!




     
    I'm now happy with the disagree icon, because its gone.
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