Tv antenna

DanielDaniel Member, Super User Posts: 1,979 ✭✭✭
edited 24 September 2017, 9:07PM in Support
So looking for some general advice on the tv antenna.

I'm making some changes to mine very soon and the guy a rang out of the yellow pages reckoned you could have 100 feeds coming from a regular bog standard TV antenna his words.

Surely this is not right. We are considering our options when my contracts expire with sky and BT. I'm aware I would need to change the lnb if I put freesat anywhere in my homes but I was thinking surely the must be a point if you are using a antenna in a load of rooms that you would have signal issues. How far is to far to split it off?

If I do go ahead with the changes to the antenna I would have two youview boxes in the living room which I have used a fly lead and the antenna out on. A youview box in the bedroom and one in the kitchen.

What I'm trying to get at is at what point would one need two antennas and this could pose some planning issues as in my area they only allow 1 antenna and one satellite dish per building without planning permission and as you guys are aware I have this already.

Fact is my sky contract is up in December and I'm going to be considering a lot of options including renewal with sky depending on price. But if I do decide to go the youview box route in other rooms and I need more than one antenna I'm thinking it might be best to apply for planning permission ASAP as this could take a while.

Comments

  • Yasha NokeYasha Noke Member Posts: 315
    edited 3 July 2017, 1:28PM
    You should only need one aerial.  Judicious use of an aerial amp/splitter is one part of the solution.  There should be no need to daisy chain your aerial from one box to another.

    Sounds as if you got lucky with your choice of an aerial fitter out of the yellow pages, at least with this particular question.
  • Chris LettsChris Letts Member Posts: 32
    edited 3 July 2017, 1:28PM
    I don't know about 100!. I use a high quality antenna, plus a single booster, to power my BT box. I need these because I'm on the fringe of the reception area. 
    If you're using a single antenna, get a good one !

    I also have a smaller second antenna which powers the three bedroom TV's. This too has a (three-way) booster.

    I don't think you can power several TV's from one antenna unless you use a booster but someone can correct me if I'm wrong.
  • Yasha NokeYasha Noke Member Posts: 315
    edited 3 July 2017, 1:28PM
    Here is an amplifier that can be part of 100 feeds off one aerial
    http://www.aerialsandtv.com/onlinesplittersandamps.html#LaunchAmp

    Avoid in room boosters if possible.  They can work but are far from ideal. A common practice is for an amplifier/splitter to be placed in the loft i.e. near the aerial. An alternative would be a mast head amplifier with the split being further down the line .

    This page has some examples of poor aerial installations:
    http://www.aerialsandtv.com/cowboyslocker.html#Forest
  • DanielDaniel Member, Super User Posts: 1,979 ✭✭✭
    edited 24 September 2017, 9:07PM
    Just to make everyone aware I won't need a 100 feeds as I live in a one bedroom bungalow it would be four maximum. I obviously only ever used two to three before so more double checking because if I put one up and I get picture break up the wife will complain about it and no prizes for who will be blamed. Secondly if two need to go up and we have to wait for planning again it will be my fault lol however it looks like there is a way to do this without putting two up thankfully.
  • Yasha NokeYasha Noke Member Posts: 315
    edited 4 July 2017, 11:58AM
    And the winner of the competition for the most sociable aerials goes to
    http://www.aerialsandtv.com/ampsandsplitters.html#morethanoneaerial
  • RoyRoy Member, Super User Posts: 16,097 ✭✭✭
    edited 4 July 2017, 11:58AM
    With a good strong signal, you can run 3 or 4 TVs off a single aerial just with splitters. But each will only get 20-30% of the incoming signal, and that is not usually enough. especially for YouView boxes, which seem to need about twice what a TV needs,

    So I would advise you to have a distribution amplifier fitted as well as the aerial; this amplifies the incoming aerial signal so each TV gets a share as strong as the incoming aerial signal.

    We feed five rooms off a six-way distribution amp. There's no mains in our loft to feed the amp power, but this is no problem; a separate power unit on one of the aerial connections feeds 12 volts DC back up the aerial cable to power the unit.

    In an older house with aging TV aerial cabling, you might want your fitter to run new lengths to each TV point. And in rooms with no TV point, he can run the cable down the outside of the house and in through the wall.

    Just ask your aerial fitter; you will be pleased at what is possible.
    These tests for COVID-19 might get right up my nose, if only I could get one
  • Colin NowellColin Nowell Member Posts: 126
    edited 24 September 2017, 9:07PM
    "Low loss" is your best friend in this situation. Low loss everything. Cabling (ct100 or ct101), 4 way splitter (ultra low loss - can be as low as 0.5db drop per tap - costs more - mine's in the loft as previously described) and finally a decent high gain antenna which can only be a good quality Log Periodic (again, higher cost than a standard Yagi antenna). This is how I feed all the rooms in my house which is also a bungalow. My Humax DTR1000 Youview runs well on this kind of setup.


    Oh and finally, NO, you do not need to change your current Sky LNB to feed a Freesat box (my Humax HDR hangs off the same octo LNB that feeds my two Sky boxes).
  • RoyRoy Member, Super User Posts: 16,097 ✭✭✭
    edited 4 July 2017, 11:58AM

    "Low loss" is your best friend in this situation. Low loss everything. Cabling (ct100 or ct101), 4 way splitter (ultra low loss - can be as low as 0.5db drop per tap - costs more - mine's in the loft as previously described) and finally a decent high gain antenna which can only be a good quality Log Periodic (again, higher cost than a standard Yagi antenna). This is how I feed all the rooms in my house which is also a bungalow. My Humax DTR1000 Youview runs well on this kind of setup.


    Oh and finally, NO, you do not need to change your current Sky LNB to feed a Freesat box (my Humax HDR hangs off the same octo LNB that feeds my two Sky boxes).

    What's the total drop on a four way splitter?

    Even with the low loss you mention, I still see a 6.5 dB drop per tap on a passive splitter., which is where my '20% of the original signal' comes from.

    Using a splitter instead of a distribution amp is entirely false economy in my book, given the overall cost of a new aerial installation.

    Most especially if you have to spend more on the aerial and the cabling just to make it feasible.

    Or get the best of both worlds - still use better cabling and a better aerial, but with a distribution amplifier anyway.
    These tests for COVID-19 might get right up my nose, if only I could get one
  • Colin NowellColin Nowell Member Posts: 126
    edited 4 July 2017, 11:58AM

    "Low loss" is your best friend in this situation. Low loss everything. Cabling (ct100 or ct101), 4 way splitter (ultra low loss - can be as low as 0.5db drop per tap - costs more - mine's in the loft as previously described) and finally a decent high gain antenna which can only be a good quality Log Periodic (again, higher cost than a standard Yagi antenna). This is how I feed all the rooms in my house which is also a bungalow. My Humax DTR1000 Youview runs well on this kind of setup.


    Oh and finally, NO, you do not need to change your current Sky LNB to feed a Freesat box (my Humax HDR hangs off the same octo LNB that feeds my two Sky boxes).

    I'm currently using 3 of the 4 available outlets and all of the output signals are well within the optimum (for a terrestrial tuner) level range of - 48 dbuV <> - 60 dbuV. In fact the worst (longest cable run) reads - 52.5 dbuV at the TV input. Signal strength 82, signal quality 100, 178 services found on a retune. (Sony Bravia) No need of the extra expense of a distribution amp in our case.

    (PS. 32 miles l-o-s from Elmley Moor transmitter)
  • RoyRoy Member, Super User Posts: 16,097 ✭✭✭
    edited 6 July 2017, 11:18PM

    "Low loss" is your best friend in this situation. Low loss everything. Cabling (ct100 or ct101), 4 way splitter (ultra low loss - can be as low as 0.5db drop per tap - costs more - mine's in the loft as previously described) and finally a decent high gain antenna which can only be a good quality Log Periodic (again, higher cost than a standard Yagi antenna). This is how I feed all the rooms in my house which is also a bungalow. My Humax DTR1000 Youview runs well on this kind of setup.


    Oh and finally, NO, you do not need to change your current Sky LNB to feed a Freesat box (my Humax HDR hangs off the same octo LNB that feeds my two Sky boxes).

    Roof aerial? You could probably get a decent picture off a piece of wet string where you are :-)

    But as I said:-

    http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/4-way-f-plu...

    Only £7, but insertion loss 6.8 - 8 dB

    Not a bad price, but Maplin are hammering their distribution amps when you can literally get the lot for £30....

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/SLx-27899D-D...

    But these are DIY prices anyway. Using a fitter, I wouldn't begrudge the extra £10 or £20 for 12 dB up to play with, if required, and distribute across those 4 outputs.
    These tests for COVID-19 might get right up my nose, if only I could get one
  • DanielDaniel Member, Super User Posts: 1,979 ✭✭✭
    edited 24 September 2017, 9:07PM
    Chears guys. I have to as per the terms of my tenancy agreement have to submit a form to ask permission. I have done this in there office and they have already told me because I got to speak to the person who grants or refuses these things that it would be granted but I need to wait for the letter before I start as this is there rules. I can appreciate a lot would just do what they want but I want to stay on the right side of the landlord and I follow there rules.


    What they did say when I get the letter there limits would be no more than 4 cables 1 antenna and 1 amplifier as it is only a small property and I already have a satellite dish up which suits my needs perfectly anyway by the look of things.
  • Matthew JohnsMatthew Johns Member Posts: 98
    edited 4 July 2017, 12:44PM

    "Low loss" is your best friend in this situation. Low loss everything. Cabling (ct100 or ct101), 4 way splitter (ultra low loss - can be as low as 0.5db drop per tap - costs more - mine's in the loft as previously described) and finally a decent high gain antenna which can only be a good quality Log Periodic (again, higher cost than a standard Yagi antenna). This is how I feed all the rooms in my house which is also a bungalow. My Humax DTR1000 Youview runs well on this kind of setup.


    Oh and finally, NO, you do not need to change your current Sky LNB to feed a Freesat box (my Humax HDR hangs off the same octo LNB that feeds my two Sky boxes).

    Just another vote for high quality cabling, which took me from being barely able to receive a signal (20 miles from Crystal Palace) to happily running youview and two other receivers off the same feed. Check your signal expectations at www.wolfbane.com and remember to get the polarity of your aerial right for your nearest transmitter.
  • DanielDaniel Member, Super User Posts: 1,979 ✭✭✭
    edited 4 July 2017, 12:45PM

    "Low loss" is your best friend in this situation. Low loss everything. Cabling (ct100 or ct101), 4 way splitter (ultra low loss - can be as low as 0.5db drop per tap - costs more - mine's in the loft as previously described) and finally a decent high gain antenna which can only be a good quality Log Periodic (again, higher cost than a standard Yagi antenna). This is how I feed all the rooms in my house which is also a bungalow. My Humax DTR1000 Youview runs well on this kind of setup.


    Oh and finally, NO, you do not need to change your current Sky LNB to feed a Freesat box (my Humax HDR hangs off the same octo LNB that feeds my two Sky boxes).

    The transmitter is bilsdale if this is relevant.
  • Matthew JohnsMatthew Johns Member Posts: 98
    edited 4 July 2017, 9:15PM

    "Low loss" is your best friend in this situation. Low loss everything. Cabling (ct100 or ct101), 4 way splitter (ultra low loss - can be as low as 0.5db drop per tap - costs more - mine's in the loft as previously described) and finally a decent high gain antenna which can only be a good quality Log Periodic (again, higher cost than a standard Yagi antenna). This is how I feed all the rooms in my house which is also a bungalow. My Humax DTR1000 Youview runs well on this kind of setup.


    Oh and finally, NO, you do not need to change your current Sky LNB to feed a Freesat box (my Humax HDR hangs off the same octo LNB that feeds my two Sky boxes).

    Assuming that you're receiving your signal directly from Bilsdale then it has horizontal polarity. It also has the height to give very good line of site for most areas so you'll only usually have to worry about distance. You'll need a wideband/Group K aerial, (under £30 from Maplin) 
  • redchizredchiz Member, Super User Posts: 5,111 ✭✭✭
    edited 24 September 2017, 9:07PM
    Oh and finally, NO, you do not need to change your current Sky LNB to feed a Freesat box (my Humax HDR hangs off the same octo LNB that feeds my two Sky boxes).
    You do if you have a Sky Q box as Daniel does I believe. They require a different type of LNB which is not backwards compatible with old-style Sky and Freesat boxes. If you want to be able to run both you will need what is known as a hybrid LNB.
  • DanielDaniel Member, Super User Posts: 1,979 ✭✭✭
    edited 4 July 2017, 9:16PM
    redchiz said:

    Oh and finally, NO, you do not need to change your current Sky LNB to feed a Freesat box (my Humax HDR hangs off the same octo LNB that feeds my two Sky boxes).
    You do if you have a Sky Q box as Daniel does I believe. They require a different type of LNB which is not backwards compatible with old-style Sky and Freesat boxes. If you want to be able to run both you will need what is known as a hybrid LNB. Yes it's currently a sky q box the lnb only has two inputs currently connected to the main sky q box so I highly doubt it's a hybrid.
  • redchizredchiz Member, Super User Posts: 5,111 ✭✭✭
    edited 4 July 2017, 11:09PM
    redchiz said:

    Oh and finally, NO, you do not need to change your current Sky LNB to feed a Freesat box (my Humax HDR hangs off the same octo LNB that feeds my two Sky boxes).
    You do if you have a Sky Q box as Daniel does I believe. They require a different type of LNB which is not backwards compatible with old-style Sky and Freesat boxes. If you want to be able to run both you will need what is known as a hybrid LNB. It isn't they are not fitted as standard.
  • DarrenDarren Member, Super User Posts: 384 ✭✭
    edited 5 July 2017, 8:45PM
    I got a new out door antenna a few years ago after the last one got storm damaged and it works fine.
    Its a wideband antenna with a 32 element. I got the guy next door to fit it with the help of my sister for half the cost of phoning an antenna installer to come out and fit it.
    I do think the LNB of dish may need changed if you got Sky Q and changed to Freesat. At lest that's what i have heard.

    Darren
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