BBC and Sky agree new content and technology partnership

jimbjimb Posts: 1,143Member ✭✭✭

Sky and the BBC have agreed a new partnership that will see the two broadcasters collaborate across content and technology.

Content collaboration

As part of the wide-ranging partnership, the BBC iPlayer app and connected red-button service will today launch on Sky Q, Sky’s next generation TV platform, offering Sky customers the full BBC iPlayer and red-button experience.

Sky viewers have long been able to enjoy BBC content on-demand via an integrated catch-up service across Sky+ and Sky Q. This new collaboration will enable Sky customers to watch BBC programmes via the BBC iPlayer app, by pressing the red button when watching a BBC channel, or through Sky’s integrated catch-up service.

Sky customers will also have easier access to BBC children’s content with popular shows from CBBC and CBeebies including The Dumping Ground, The Worst Witch and Topsy & Tim, set to be available as box-set series across the Kids section of Sky Q, including within the Kids Safe Mode which was launched by Sky earlier this year.

The broadcasters are also exploring a range of other partnership opportunities, including the availability of BBC Sounds on Sky and NOW TV platforms, to offer even more to Sky customers and licence fee payers, as well as committing to BBC content being available on Sky’s future TV platform.

Innovating for viewers

The BBC and Sky are also in early stage exploration to use PromoSmart, powered by AdSmart Sky’s targeting technology, to serve up more personalised promotional content to BBC viewers. In practice, this will mean that viewers in different households could be shown different trailers for BBC content that are more relevant to their interests during the breaks between programmes when watching BBC channels live.

Stephen van Rooyen, CEO UK & Ireland, Sky, said: “We are pleased to be working with the BBC on such a broad-ranging partnership – it is a great example of how UK broadcasters can work together for the benefit of viewers and the industry. We are continuing to explore, together with the BBC, how it could use Sky’s innovative technology to help it better connect with licence-fee payers for the long term.”

Bob Shennan, Group Managing Director, BBC, said: “We’re thrilled that viewers who watch our programmes on Sky will now be able to enjoy the full BBC iPlayer experience, and to access our full red-button service. BBC iPlayer is a fantastic way to watch the incredible breadth of programmes the BBC offers, including fantastic full series, terrific archive content, brilliant new dramas like His Dark Materials, landmark natural history programmes like Seven Worlds, One Planet and hilarious comedies like Motherland. We’re also very much looking forward to experimenting with PromoSmart in the future. This agreement shows how the BBC and Sky can work together to give audiences the very best experience and support a strong UK media industry, and we look forward to continuing this relationship.”

Comments

  • VisionmanVisionman Posts: 9,548Member ✭✭✭
    I wonder why Sky finally caved in to the BBC? They detest the iPlayer as they view it as a rival to their subscription on demand content.
  • RoyRoy Posts: 15,249Member ✭✭✭
    Visionman said:
    I wonder why Sky finally caved in to the BBC? They detest the iPlayer as they view it as a rival to their subscription on demand content.
    Just about every Sky user has the BBC iPlayer as an app on the TV they watch Sky on, so if they want to use the iPlayer, they can; but Sky are aware that once they leave the Sky walled garden, they may take a while to come back.

    Integrating the iPlayer, which keeps them within the walled garden, is the lesser of two evils for Sky.
    This might at last be getting back to the YouView that I knew.  :|
    Holding my breath....
  • redchizredchiz Posts: 4,967Member ✭✭✭
    Interesting use of the word "partnership" don't you think?
  • VisionmanVisionman Posts: 9,548Member ✭✭✭
    Indeed. Sky & the BBC have a very long history, which isn't a good one. Zero cost carriage fees from £40m a year to zero was the doozy. With Sky even being dragged to Number 10 to be TOLD they would from hence forth charge the BBC zero to broadcast its channels on its EPG. Not good, not pretty, and very public. And there have been many other incidents...
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